Last Day of the Year 年暮れ

Today I experienced for the first time preparing osechi ryôri, traditional Japanese New Year’s dishes. There was a lot to make, so we stayed busy, but we really had a nice time making food together. I got a feeling of what many Japanese families experience at this time of year. Here Somemaru makes me feel like a member of his family, so it was all thoroughly enjoyable. I took a lot of pictures since this was all a first for me. I’ll share some of them below.

Despite being busy today, Somemaru was kind to make time for an interesting lecture on all of the various influences on rakugo, be they sekkyô (Buddhist sermons), kabuki, hayari uta (popular songs), etc. He also went into the differences between Kamigata rakugo and its counterpart in Tokyo. He gave a great example in the story Kuchi ire ya. This is originally a Kamigata story. Apparently when it was taken to Tokyo it was changed drastically. Rather, much was cut from the original story. In the Kamigata version, Kuchi ireya is a story that takes place largely in an Osaka shipping merchant’s house. It is a story intended for the merchant society of Osaka. Tokyo, unlike Osaka, it historically a city made up of artisans and samurai, so the Tokyo storyteller(s) completely cut the section that deals with the shipping house (over half of the original story).  The title was changed too. In Tokyo this story is called Hikkoshi no yume (Dream about Moving).

We ate for dinner what most Japanese families traditionally eat on New Year’s Eve: toshikoshi soba. Translated literally this means “seeing-out-the-old-year buckwheat noodles.” When I asked Somemaru why Japanese eat this dish at this time of year, he told me a story about how when Japanese make gold leaf in the traditional style they sprinkle buckwheat flour in between the gold and the boards used to smash it. Apparently this allows the artisans to easily separate the final product from the tool. At some point in history it thus became a tradition to eat soba on New Year’s Eve, in hopes of becoming rich (okane mochi [lit. possessing gold]) in the New Year. Somemaru said there is other lore that explains various reasons for enjoying toshikoshi soba, but I like this story. I hope we all become rich in 2011!

今日、お節料理を作るのを初めて経験しました。作るものは沢山あって、忙しかったけど、一緒に料理しながらとても楽しい時間を過ごしました。日本の家族はこの時期にどのように一緒に過ごすか分かった気がしました。ここでは師匠は本当に家族のメンバーのように扱ってくださっているので、今日も全面的に楽しかったです。今日は初経験なのはほとんどだったので、写真沢山撮りました。下の方にお見せしたいと思います。

今日は忙しかったことに関わらず、師匠はとても優しいことしてくださいました。落語の影響(説教、歌舞伎、流行歌、等)についてレクチャーをしてくださいました。上方落語と東京落語の違いについても教えてくださいました。その中にとてもいい例を進めました。それは「口入屋」という噺です。もともと上方の噺で、東京に持っていかれたときに大分変化されたらしいです。変化というよりも、その内容は沢山カットされました。上方の「口入屋」はほとんど大阪の船場で行われる噺で、大阪の商人のためのような噺です。東京は大阪と違って、職人と侍の方が昔から多かったので、東京の落語家は船場の部分(噺の半分以上)を完全にカットしました。ネタ名までも変えました。東京では「引越の夢」といます。

今晩、多くの日本の家族がお晦日に食べる年越しそばは、僕もいただけました。師匠に「日本人はなぜそばをこの時に食べますか」と聞いたら、「昔、日本人が金箔を作っていたときに、金潰しに使う板と板の間に、金箔が剥がしやいようになるのにそば粉を振りかけていた」という話をしてくださいました。歴史の流れのいつか、新年にお金(=金箔)持ちになるようにお晦日にそばを食べる習慣ができました。染丸師匠によると、年越しそばを食べる習慣を説明する伝説はそれぞれあります。しかし、師匠がしてくださった話が一番好きだと思います。平成23年に皆でお金持ちになるといいですね!



Advertisements

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s