First Practice with Somemaru 師匠と初お稽古

Today I had my first formal lesson with Somemaru. Four days ago when I asked Somemaru for the lesson, there was only one other pupil scheduled for a lesson. Three others came forward since then to ask for lessons, so I got bumped to #5… I felt bad that Somemaru ended up with such a long day. Despite having four rather long lessons–averaging an hour and a half a piece–Somemaru still told me to take a seat in front of him at the end of the day.

The experience was everything yet nothing that I expected. Though I had the story, Sake no kasu, memorized for the most, Somemaru spent much time correcting my Japanese. This is not necessarily because I am not a native speaker of the language, though. True, I may have a “strange” accent that needs more correction than usual, but Somemaru also critiques his formal pupils for not using correct pronunciation and accent. Take, for instance, one of the lessons before mine; though the pupil managed to make his way through the story, the session seemed more like an Osaka dialect lesson than one on rakugo. This makes it clear to me that I’m not being singled out because of my poor Japanese. Because Kamigata Rakugo is an Osaka comic narrative art, Somemaru wants to make sure that his pupils present just that.

As I mentioned before, I learned Sake no kasu from Somemaru in an informal setting. I later received from Aisome a homemade script of the story, which I then memorized. I was somewhat surprised that Somemaru rejected completely some of the lines that I recited, but I was also aware of the fact that rakugo is anything but a scripted art. In theory, the basic framework of stories remain the same, but the words used to fill out story framework changes with each telling. So, essentially, the story I brought to today’s lesson was not the same when the lesson was over. Indeed, the creative potential of rakugo is thrilling.

Somemaru directed me on some of the basics of rakugo acting techniques. There are several characters in the story Sake no kasu, but (fortunately), just two appear together at any given time. Keep in mind that one hanashika performs all roles; if three or more characters appear at a time–and this is often the case–things can become quite complicated. Distinctions between characters are made by applying a number of techniques, but the most basic of these is called kami-shimo hô (high-low technique). In practically every pairing of characters a distinction is made in their hierarchy, whether this be a difference in social status, age, working relationship, etc. When the hanashika takes the role of person of higher rank, in most cases anyway, (s)he adjusts his gaze slightly to stage right (audience’s left) when addressing a character of lower rank. The case is the opposite when performing characters of lower rank. My kami-shimo angles were adjusted far too widely, so Somemaru corrected me on this. There were a number of other things that Somemaru helped me improve on, but I won’t go into the details here. Needless to say, I learned a great deal in today’s lesson.

As you might have guessed, I was nervous to sit in front of Somemaru for a formal lesson. I wore a yukata, and had with me the necessary properties, a sensu and tenugui. Though I brought along a recording device, perhaps because of my nerves, I failed to hit the record button. This may be for the better though; Somemaru has said all along that relying on recording devices and scripts is not the best way to go about learning rakugo. Considering this, my first lesson was done the “old-fashioned” way. That is, it was done the right way, via pure oral transmission. I truly appreciate having this experience with Somemaru, and hope that I may have more opportunities such as this. Thank you very much Shishô.

今日は染丸師匠との初お稽古をさせていただきました。お稽古をお願いした四日前までは、まだ僕の他に一人しかお稽古のスケジュールは入っていなかったけど、その後もう3人お稽古が入り、僕は5人目になってしまいました。師匠にとっては大変長い一日になってしまい、本当に申し訳なかったです。僕の前に4人のお稽古(1人約90分ずつ)があったにも関わらず、最後に僕のお稽古までもつけてくださいました。

今日のお稽古では予想していたこともあったけど、全く予想しなかったこともありました。「酒の粕」を一応覚えていったのですが、師匠が僕の日本語を直すのに時間をたくさんかけました。しかし、これは僕がネイティブ・スピーカーじゃないからというわけではないです。確かに僕の日本語に変な訛りなど直さないといけないところが山ほどあるかもしれませんが、師匠が一門の弟子の発音やアクセントなどもよく注意します。例えば、僕の前のお稽古ですが、ある弟子は噺を最後まで語れたものの、落語のお稽古より、大阪弁の教室のような感じがしました。これを見て、僕の日本語は下手だから直されているんじゃないということが分かりました。上方落語は大阪の滑稽話芸であるからこそ、染丸師匠が弟子にちゃんとした大阪弁を使ってほしいというわけです。

前のブログに書いたように、非公式に師匠から「酒の粕」を教えていただきました。愛染さんからその台本をもらって、それを覚えました。ちょっとびっくりしたことに、ある台詞を師匠はまったく認めてくださらなかったです。しかし、落語は「台本の芸」ではないということを前から知っていました。論理的には、落語の噺の基本的な骨組みをあまり変えたらいけないんですが、その中に入る言葉は毎回変わります。ですから、今日覚えていた「酒の粕」は、レッスンの前と後は本質的に変わりました。落語の創作的な可能性は本当にぞくぞくさせるようなものです。

落語の演出の基本についても、師匠が教えてくださいました。「酒の粕」の登場人物は数人もいるんですが、(良かったことに)場面に登場するキャラクターは二人しかいません。噺家は全ての役を演じることを忘れてはいけません。人物が3人を超えると(これはよくあることです)かなり複雑になってくるんです。人物をくべつする・させるための方法はいろいろありますが、最も基本的なのは「上下法」というものです。ほとんど全てのキャラクターの出会い方、社会的地位、年齢、仕事、階層の区別ができます。噺家は、高い地位の登場人物が低い地位の人物と会話をしている場面ではほとんどの場合、少し下手(客席から見て左の方)へ向かいます。逆の場合には、噺家が上手に向かって演じます。僕がしていた上下法は広すぎたので、染丸師匠がそれを直してくださいました。それだけじゃなくて、師匠がいろいろなことを教えてくださいました。当たり前のことかもしれないけど、今日は大変勉強になりました。

もちろんのことですが、師匠の前でお稽古をするということですから、とても緊張してしまいました。浴衣に着替えて、手拭いも扇子も持っていきました。録音機械を一応持っていったけど、緊張していたからか、ちゃんと「録音」ボタンを押しませんでした。しかし、その方が良かったかもしれません。落語を習うのに録音機械や台本などに依存することは良くないと前から染丸師匠がおっしゃっています。このことを考えてみれば、今日のレッスンは「旧式」でした。しかし、このやり方は純粋な口頭伝授でとてもよかったです。師匠とのこのような経験は大変ありがたく、また今度師匠とお稽古できたらなあと心より思っています。師匠、本当にありがとうございました。

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “First Practice with Somemaru 師匠と初お稽古

    • Dad, yeah, Diane is a lot of fun to hang out with… We live relatively close to each other but we can’t seem to make time to get together… I’ve seen her perform rakugo in English, but I have yet to see her balloon show. She’s got some amazing pics on her homepage, which is worth checking out.

  1. From the blogroll, Diane Kitchijitsu gives one a good lesson on Rakugo.
    Very informative. I’ll bet she would be a real to spend some time with.

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s