Somemaru’s Kôza, Outstanding! さすが染丸師匠の高座!

Today I got dressed in kimono and went to the hiru-seki (afternoon show) at the Hanjôtei to see Somemaru perform. Fortunately I found a seat up front, at far stage right. I sat next to a man, who, with his shoes off and legs stretched out, seemed intent on sleeping throughout the show. Let me digress by making a few comments about this man.

At first I thought the man was being rude by sleeping, but I soon noticed he wasn’t sleeping at all. I know he was awake because he took notes at the beginning and end of each kôza. He was listening, and rather actively. During each makura he would whisper to himself the title of story he thought hanashika were leading into. As I listened to him guess, I realized he was correct in almost every case.

From a Western (and contemporary Japanese) point of view, the man was being rude. The way he lounged in his seat and kept his eyes closed sent the message that he wasn’t interested in being there, or thought the performances weren’t worth much. This is not so from the traditional Japanese (rakugo) perspective, though. Being that rakugo is a narrative art to be listened to and not necessarily one to be watched, this man was putting each hanashika to the test by refusing to watch their facial expressions, gesticulations, and (in some cases) excessive animation. The way he was sitting, too, is what hanashika and yose owners have long desired–that people make themselves at home, as if they were in their own living rooms. This is one reason that, at the Hanjôtei and some other yose, you can see the character 樂 (raku, relax, ease, calm) affixed to the wall behind hanashika, at upstage center. The man I sat next to was therefore not being rude. He was a rakugo tsû (connoisseur). He listened closely, and made hanashika work for his laughter. With knowledge of this, I was especially glad to see it when the man was sitting up in his seat, eyes wide open, for the tori (final act, headliner), Somemaru.

It goes without saying, Somemaru’s kôza was outstanding. It had been quite a while since I had listened to Somemaru’s rakugo from the audience, so this was a nice treat. I was able to see him in full view and observe the audience’s delight as he narrated his story, today Shaku no aigusuri (The Best Medicine for Nervous Cramps). Of course there were other great acts today (e.g., Katura Bunya’s Kyô no chazuke [Tea over Rice, Kyoto-style] was quite enjoyable, reminiscent of his master’s [Katsura Bunshi V] version of the same story), but Somemaru has a special talent for drawing in the audience, making them feel comfortable, and feel there is no other place in the world he would rather be than right there on stage before them for his 40-minute set as tori. Indeed, Somemaru is a true professional, from opening bow to closing bow. One must note, too, his kimono are absolutely fabulous.

It is difficult for anybody to sit in one place for three to four hours, and this is why the more seasoned, talented hanashika perform later on the yose bill. This is why Somemaru performs last. The promise of his appearance keeps people in their seats, and his performance makes them forget it if they were tired. It seems that all hanashika throughout the long show have their own ways of comically empathizing with the audience, their own ways of thanking them for sticking around to the end of the show. This is how Somemaru began his kôza today, too, with a joke about how long the show was, and sincere expression of his gratitude for their staying to listen to him.

Following the show, I paid Somemaru a visit in the gakuya, bowed, told him I loved the show, and bowed once more to make my leave. “Where are you going? You better at least stick around for dinner,” he said. “I doubt you’ve been eating anything good lately anyway.” How could I argue with that? Besides, Somemaru was right, I hadn’t eaten anything very good since the last time I saw him. From there, we went out to eat. I got the same thing Somemaru ordered: unagi don and ebi tenpura no soba (broiled eel over rice and deep-fried prawn over buckwheat noodles). While savoring this, I was lucky to sit in on Somemaru’s dinner-time lecture to his pupil Someya about the psychology of characters in a story he is currently learning.

Shishô, thank you for a great kôza, and a wonderful dinner!

今日、着物を着て繁昌亭まで染丸師匠の高座(昼席)を聴きに行きました。良かったことに、一番前、下手の端に席がありました。その隣に、靴がもう脱いであって、足をずっと前に伸ばしていて、寝るつもりでいそうな男の方が座っていました。この方についてコメントを書きたいので、ちょっとだけ本筋からそれます。

男の方が寝ているようにみえたので、最初はとても失礼やなと思っていました。しかし、時間がちょっと経つと彼が寝ていなかったことに気づきました。なぜならば、それぞれの高座の最初と最後に必ずノートを書いていました。寧ろ、今日の噺を傾聴していました。枕の間、まだ題が発表されていないうちに題を当てようとしていました。それを聞いてみると、ほとんどが当たりでした。

欧米史観では(現代の日本人の見方にしても)、この方は失礼に見えました。目を閉じているままで客席でのんびりくつろいでいるというのは、別にあそこに居たいと思っていない、それぞれのパフォーマンスに値打ちがない、というメッセージしか伝わらないでしょう。しかし、伝統的な(落語)の史観でいくと、この行動は失礼でありません。落語は見る芸じゃなくて、聴く芸であるので、今日の噺家の表情、身振り手振り、そして(ある噺家の)過度な動きを見ていないということは、噺家の(話)芸を試していたことに違いません。彼の座り方ですが、昔から噺家・寄席の主人はきっとこの様にしてもらいたかったのだと思います。お客さんが寄席に寄って、くつろげるように、自分のリビングルームに居るように感じさせたかったのだと思います。「樂」という字が繁昌亭と他の寄席(噺家の後ろ上)にかけてある理由の一つはこれなんです。ですから、今日、隣に座っていた方は別に失礼なことをしていませんでした。彼は「落語通」じゃないかなと僕は思っています。噺をよく聴いていましたが、彼のような人を笑わせるために、噺家はその力量を試されたでしょう。こんな厳しい落語通だったにも関わらず、取りを務めていらしゃった染丸師匠が高座にあがると、落語通が自分の席に座り直し、師匠の高座をじっと見ながら聴いていました。これを見ると、さすが大師匠やなと思いました。

言わずもがなですが、師匠の落語は素晴らしかった。師匠の高座を客席で聴くのは本当に久しぶりだったので、とても贅沢でした。師匠がはっきり見えたし、寄席にいるお客さんたちの喜んでいる姿も拝見できました。今日の噺は「癪の合薬」でした。もちろん、この他に面白い噺(例:桂文也師匠の「京の茶漬け」が良くて、文枝師匠の「京の茶漬け」を思い出しました)が発表されていましたが、やはり染丸師匠の高座は特別でした。お客さんを上手に引き込み、お上手に「樂」にさせます。その上、取り席の40分の間、高座以外の場所に居たいという感じを全くさせませんでした。さすが、最初のお辞儀から最後のお辞儀まで、師匠が真のプロです(着物の上品な着方も特筆です)。

誰にとっても、3、4時間くらい一カ所に座り込むことはなかなか難しいことですよね。寄席の人々もこれをちゃんと分かっています。ですから、才能あるベテラン噺家が前半と後半の最後の方に出てきます。このため染丸師匠が取りと中取りを務めます。最後に出てきてくださるから、お客さんは最後まで席を外さず、疲れていたことも忘れてしまいます。噺家はお客さんの退屈予防にか、様々な工夫(長時間座っていることをユーモラスな冗談にして)があって、最後まで聴いてくれることに対して様々な感謝の表現もあるみたいです。染丸師匠も、そこから高座を始めました。昼席の長さについてジョークを言ってから、ご本人の高座まで待ってくれたことに対して感謝の意をおっしゃいました。

昼席が終わって、師匠の楽屋まで挨拶に参りました。お辞儀して、「師匠、おつかれさまでございました」と言いました。もう一度お辞儀して帰ろうとしたら、「どこ行くねん」と師匠がおしゃっていました。「晩ご飯ぐらい食べて帰りな。最近、上手いもん食ってへんやろ」と。師匠が本当に優しいですね。師匠のおっしゃる通り、この間あまりいいものを食べていなかったので、お言葉に甘えてしまいました。それから食べに行って、師匠と同じメニューをいただきました:鰻丼と海老天ぷらのそば。これをゆっくり味わうながら、弟子の染弥さんにしていた(お稽古中の噺に出て来る人物の心理について)ディナータイムレクチャーを聞かせていただきました。

師匠、素晴らしい高座も美味しい晩ご飯も本当にどうもありがとうございました。

Advertisements

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s