Katsura Kichibô 桂吉坊さん

Until August 12 I will be taking part in the 27th Traditional Theater Training program at the Kyoto Art Center. There are three courses of specialization, noh, kyogen, and Nihon buyô, all of which are led by professional artists. I am in the kyogen group.

The first two days of the program consist of a series of demonstrations, lectures, tours, and workshops. These are to help give participants a taste of those traditional arts they won’t be experiencing in their selected courses, and to see how they may be related to their areas of specialization.

The program will culminate with a recital, to be held on August 12, 2011 at 5:30 p.m. (doors open at 5:00), at the Ôe Noh Theater (Ôe nôgaku dô). Admission is FREE, and reservations are not necessary.

I was happy to learn that rakugo was going to be part of the initial two-day series. The center arranged for a young hanashika, Katsura Kichibô, to give a demonstration and workshop. Since I study rakugo, I was asked to do the interpreting.

I knew of Kichibô, but never had the chance to meet him. It was a treat to finally meet him today. He is a very kind, and professional person, who I would like to introduce here.

I translated the following for the Kyoto Art Center program:

11:00-13:00: Rakugo Demonstration & Workshop, with Katsura Kichibô

Rakugo is a traditional Japanese narrative art form that came into being during the early modern era and was passed down to the present day via oral transmission. In this unique performance art, gestures and narration alone are incorporated, and a high level of artistry is required. Katsura Kichibô’s repertoire consists chiefly of traditional rakugo stories. He is therefore a young storyteller who many consider to be the hope for Kamigata Rakugo’s future. Today, following a demonstration of the art, Kichibô-sensei will lead a workshop on rakugo gesticulation and more.

Shortly after graduation from the Entertainment and Culture Division at Osaka Higashi Sumiyoshi High School, Kichibô-sensei began a formal apprenticeship with rakugo storyteller Katsura Kitchô, on January 10, 1999. A proud member of the Katsura Beichô artistic family, Kichibô-sensei is also undergoing formal training in the arts of drum(s), flute(s), shamisen, and nagauta. He is knowledgeable about numerous forms of traditional entertainment such as kabuki, noh, and bunraku. This can be observed in his rakugo, especially his skillfully narrated kabuki-inspired stories. Kichibô-sensei is currently studying noh (chanting and kotsuzumi drum) privately, and is frequently called on to serve as master of ceremonies at Noh-related functions.

I am looking forward to listening to Kichibô perform in the near future, and hope you can make it too. Kichibô has a great official website, complete with information about upcoming performances. Click here → Kichi Box

8月12日まで京都芸術センターの第27回トラディショナル・シアター・トレーニング2011に参加しています。専門コースが3つありまして(能、狂言、日本舞踊)、プロの先生が指導してくださいます。僕は狂言のコースに入っています。

最初の2日間、様々なデモンストレーション、レクチャー、ツアー、ワークショップなどのシリーズがあります。参加者の専門以外の伝統芸能を味わうためでもあるし、他の芸が自分の専門にどのようにつながっているということを理解するためでもあります。

トラディショナル・シアター・トレーニングの最後に発表会があり、8月12日の17:30(17:00会場)に大江能楽堂で行います。入場無料で事前予約不要です。

ワークショップなどのシリーズですが、落語の部も入ると聞いたら、とても嬉しかったです。今回の講師は桂吉坊さんでした。落語の研究をしているため、僕が同時通訳をすることになりました。

この前、吉坊さんの名前を何度も聞いていますが、今日は初めてお会いできました。とても親切で、プロフェッショナルは方でした。ここで桂吉坊さんを紹介させていただきたいと思います。

次の文書を京都芸術センターのプログラムのために翻訳させていただきました:

11:00~13:00: 落語のデモンストレーションとワークショップ 桂吉坊

落語は、近世期の日本において成立し、現在まで伝承されている伝統的な話芸の一種です。身振りと語りのみで物語を進めてゆく独特の演芸であり、高度な技芸を要します。講師の桂吉坊先生は、古典落語を中心に舞台を重ね、上方落語のホープとして多方面から期待されている若手落語家です。ワークショップでは、落語の実演が行われた後、仕草についてなどを教えていただきます。

桂吉坊先生は大阪府立東住吉高等学校芸能文化科卒業後、1999年1月10日に桂吉朝に入門。米朝一門らしく太鼓、笛はもちろん、三味線や長唄も習得しておられます。歌舞伎や能・文楽などの古典芸能に詳しく、落語においても歌舞伎を題材とした芝居噺を得意としています。現在は能楽(謡や小鼓)を個人的に習っているほか、能楽の催しに司会として呼ばれることも多いそうです。

これからも吉坊さんの高座を聴かしていただける日をとても楽しみしています。皆さん、ぜひ、一緒に聴きに行きましょう。ところで、吉坊さんがとてもおしゃれな公式サイトを持ち、あそこに出演情報のリンクもあります。こちらへどうぞ → Kichi Box

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Katsura Kichibô 桂吉坊さん

    • Yeah, but this young man has been at it for quite a while. Quite an impressive person from my point of view. Apparently he is also one of few who continue the tradition of Nishiki-e kagei, which he learned from his late master, Kitchou (吉朝).

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s