Crying and Laughing with Somemaru 師匠と泣いたり笑ったり

日本語の翻訳(下)を大変お待たせいたしました。

Today Somemaru invited me to see a special taishû engeki production featuring the troupe of Hasegawa Takeya. Today Takeya’s wife, Ai Kyôka, starred in a play as “Okichi,” a woman who, legend has it, was forced to become a mistress against her will for the first American Consul in Japan, Townsend Harris (1804-78). In today’s version, Okichi reluctantly submits to the “call of duty,” but she and her true love, Tsurumatsu (Takeya), reunite years later. As happy as this reunion is, they pay for it dearly in a life filled with tragedy after heartbreaking tragedy. The couple never loses in the eyes of the audience though, because the couple’s love is undying in the truest sense. They maintain utmost dignity by refusing to let go of the one thing they value more than life: one another. Needless to say, I was deeply moved by the performance.

This  play was a tear-jerker indeed. At points the entire theater was in tears! There were also happy points in the play where the audience (a completely packed house, some standing) could not help laughing out loud.

Can something like taishû engeki discussed side by side with rakugo? On the surface, they do not seem to have a single thing in common. In taishû engeki, audiences just have to sit back and enjoy the wonderful spectacle of bright lights, blaring music, fabulous makeup and kimono, and sex appeal. In traditional (denshô) rakugo, much more imagination is needed, along with a little knowledge about early modern Japan. Yet, there are some things these arts have in common that warrants discussing them together.

While taishû engeki is decidedly dramatic and rakugo comedic, they can also be the opposite. Themes of plays and stories are often similar, as are the periods (usually Edo and Meiji) represented. Another important thing they have in common is that they are both forms of taishû geinô, or arts for the masses. Both have their roots in the lower ranks of society, and were meant for people of the same class. While entertainers in both worlds occasional become wealthy, and it is not uncommon for the rich patronize them, taishû engeki and rakugo can still be considered arts of the taishû variety.

After having a good cry, along with some good laughs at the show, Somemaru and I got Chinese for dinner and parted for the evening.

Thank you for a great Monday Shishô!

今日は染丸師匠が大衆演劇の特別公演に誘ってくださり、長谷川武弥座長の一座のショーをたっぷり楽しませていただきました。武弥座長の奥さんである愛京花さんが今日、芝居で「お吉」という役を務めました。お吉という人物については色々な説がありますが、よく言われているのは、お吉が日本で最初の領事となったタウンセンド・ハリス氏(1804−78年)の愛人になり、その後捨てられると。今日の芝居ではお吉が「日本の国のため」義理に屈しますが、数年後、純粋に愛していた最初に諦めた恋人「鶴松」に再会し、彼とよりを戻します。これは涙の再会場面となりますが、その後二人の人生は悲劇だらけで、精一杯です。しかし、そのような悲劇の中でも、お吉と鶴松はとても素敵なカップルです。二人は死に直面することがあっても、彼らの愛は全く死にません。ですから、観客の目から見ると、一見この二人は人生で負けていても、全体像では負けていません。世の中に一番大事なもの(お互い)を離さないから、最後まで威厳を保ちます。今更言う必要はありませんが、とっても感動しました。

何と言っても今日の芝居は涙なしでは見られませんでした。ある場面では、満席立ち見状態の観客全員が、一緒に泣いている様でした。しかし、爆笑する滑稽な場面もありました。

大衆演劇というものは、落語と並べて語ることができるものなのでしょうか。なぜなら、表面的に見ると共通点は一つもないようです。大衆演劇では客は席にポンと座って、明るい照明や、けたたましい音楽や、素敵な化粧や着物や、役者の性的魅力などを楽しむだけでいい、いわば受け身の演劇です。しかし、(伝承)落語の場合は、客の能動性が必要です。落語を聞く上で、客の想像は何よりも大事じゃないでしょうか。さらに、近世日本についての知識が少しあれば、昔から伝わってきた噺の内容をより深く理解することができます。でも、上記に関わらず、大衆演劇と落語は共通点もあるんです。

大衆演劇は明らかにドラマチック、落語は確かに滑稽な芸ですが、実は、両方それぞれがその逆になることもよくあります。芝居と噺のテーマも似ているときもあり、よく描写される時代(江戸・明治)も同じです。そして、両方が日本社会に生きる一般の人々のための大衆芸能であります。大衆演劇も落語も庶民に根ざした芸能であり、元々同じような階級の人々のための芸でありました。近代になって、双方の芸人がお金持ちになる場合もあり、お金持ちの客がスポンサーになることもありますが、両方を大衆芸能と読んでもいいでしょう。

今日の特別公演ではよく泣いたり笑ったりし、その後師匠と一緒に中華料理を食べに行って、御馳走になりました。

師匠、素敵な月曜日、本当にどうもありがとうございました。

Advertisements

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s