Earthenware Pot and the Mouse 土鍋鼠

Last night was a night full of dreams.

Or at least I could remember many of them upon waking up.

It’s been a while since I’ve remembered my dreams so clearly.

I’ve heard  that one is becoming truly fluent in a second language when s/he starts dreaming in that language.

Well, what does it mean when you begin dreaming about hanashika, and your dreams are like rakugo stories?

Last night I had the following dream.

I was at Katsura Yonedanji V’s (Katsura Beichô III’s pupil, and own son) house for breakfast. I don’t remember what was being prepared, but the house was very Western. In fact, I think we were in my parents’ next-door neighbors’ house.

I was calling Yonedanji “Yonedanji-san,” and then it dawned on me that, since he has rakugo pupils of his own, I should probably be calling him Yonedanji-shishô. Wow, even in my dreams I am concerned with obeying the rules of hierarchical society…

I apologized and inquired, “you have two pupils now, right?” “Five,” he corrected me. Indeed, the kitchen and dining room was bustling with good-looking young men, busy preparing breakfast and setting the table. (In reality he does have two.)

Then Yonedanji and I had the following conversation:

YONEDANJI: I have a really nice, old earthenware nabe [for hotpot] that belonged to my mother. She doesn’t need it anymore and I’ve been trying to find a good friend to give it to. Could you use it?

I have my own (cheap) nabe, so I really do not need another, but I thought, since this nabe technically belonged to the Living National Treasure Katsura Beichô, I should probably not turn it down.

MATT: Really? Me? Are you sure? How could I…

With that, Yonedanji went outside to a picnic table to fetch the nabe. I could see him through a window, but I tried not to watch him for fear of being rude. He returned with a handsome though dusty, antique nabe.

YONEDANJI: Here it is. Take a look.

I took it in my hands and opened the lid. Inside, I was surprised to find a little mouse. I wasn’t sure if Yonedanji had seen it, so, to keep from startling him, and  his deshi, I commented casually.

MATT: Oh, there’s a little mouse inside.

With this Yonedanji, and all of his deshi, erupted in laughter. He explained how easy it is to catch mice in nabe by putting a little food inside and leaving the lid cracked open. Indeed, Yondedanji was quite pleased with himself.

The joke was on me, and I can’t remember if I even got to keep Beicho’s nabe!

Maybe I will find out as I dream tonight.

夕べ、夢を沢山見ました。

ま、起きたらいくつか記憶に残っていました。

夢をこんなにはっきり覚えているのは久しぶりです。

第二言語で夢を見ていたら、もうぺらぺらだとどこかで聞きましたな。

でも、噺家について夢を見て、その内容が落語の根多のような感じでしたら、どういう意味なんかな...

夕べ、こんな夢を見ました。

5代目桂米団治さん(3代目米朝師匠の弟子、実の息子)の家で朝ご飯を食べることになっていました。どんな料理を用意されていたかはよく覚えていませんが、彼の家は本当に洋風の家でした。確かに、私たちはうちの親のお隣さんの家の中にいました。

最初は「米団治さん、米団治さん」と言い、お弟子さんがいるので、やはり「米団治師匠」と呼んだ方がいいでしょうと思いつきました。凄いなあ、夢の中でも縦社会を気にしている...

彼に謝り、「米団治師匠って、お弟子さんは2人いますよね。」と言い、「5人」と直されました。ひょっとしたら、朝ご飯の準備で忙しかったイケメンがいっぱいだったからかもしれません。キッチンもダイニングルームも賑やかでした。(現実には弟子が2人います。)

米団治さんと次の会話がありました。

米団治:「うちのお母さんが使っていた古い、ええ土鍋あるんやけど、もう要らんと言うさかい、ええ友達にあげようと思っていたんや。マットは要らん?」

実は、僕は(安い)土鍋があるから、もう一つは要りませんねぇと思いました。けど...厳密には、その土鍋は人間国宝の桂米朝師匠がお使いになった土鍋でしょう。断ったらいけないなと思いました。

マット:「えっ?僕?本当ですかっ?そんなぁ...」

すると、米団治さんが家の外にあるピクニックテーブルの上から土鍋を取りに行きました。窓から彼の姿が見えていたんですが、あまりじっと見たら失礼でしょうと思い、目をそらしました。帰ってくると、手に持っていたのはちょっと埃のついた粋なアンティークの土鍋でした。

米団治:「これ、見てみ。」

土鍋を手に取り、ふたを開けると、小さな鼠が中に入っていましたので、びっくりしました。米団治さんが気づいているかどうか分からなかったので、びっくりさせないように、さりげなく

マット:「おぉ、小ちゃい鼠入ってますねぇ。」

と言うと、米団治さん、そして皆が大爆笑しました。その後、米団治さんが、土鍋にちょっとした餌を入れて、蓋をちょっと開けとくだけで鼠をすぐ捕まえられるでととても自慢しながら説明しました。

メッチャいたずらされました。米朝師匠の土鍋をいただいて帰れたかまでは記憶にありませんが...

今晩また夢を見て、それが分かるかもしれません。

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Earthenware Pot and the Mouse 土鍋鼠

    • Mona,
      Thank you for reading my blog. Writing in Japanese is one more great tool that helps with learning Japanese. I also try to read all my entries out loud (though not too loud) as that helps with reading, and even listening. My Japanese – and English – still needs work, but it’s all about making progress, right?
      Best luck in your studies, and in winning a trip to Japan.
      m

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s