Ômisoka&Gantan 大晦日&元旦

Just like last year, this year I spent Ômisoka (December 31) and Gantan (January 1) at Somemaru’s house. This is a very busy, but very enjoyable time of the year.

One reason I like New Year (Oshôgatsu) in Japan is that it is a time of togetherness for most families. It is the one time of year when the majority of stores close and people are able to focus on things other than work and the commercial world outside their doors. This is also a time when a good deal of the country flocks to local temples and shrines for New Year’s blessings, buying amulets for any number of things, such as commuter safety, help finding true love, having successful childbirth, passing high school and college entrance exams, and so on.

One soon learns that Japanese people (or at least NHK) take Oshôgatsu seriously when they observe the way the wildly popular annual music program Kôhaku uta gassen comes to a sudden, anticlimactic end at Countdown: 10, 9. 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1… CUT TO QUIET, SOLEMN SHOTS OF TEMPLES AROUND THE NATION.

Ômisoka and Gantan at Somemaru’s are not exactly solemn, but he does adhere to old customs as far as food (osechi) preparation and ceremonial sake (otoso) pouring goes. Pupils in training and children receive money gifts (otoshidama), and the list of customs followed goes on. Again, togetherness is key. This is the best thing about the holiday.

On Ômisoka I spent the entire day assisting Somemaru with osechi preparation, making enough food for about 40 people. Somemaru does all the cooking himself, working all day in the kitchen, hardly taking a break. Actually, I had to remind him to take a break from time to time. On one of our breaks we enjoyed toshikoshi soba, long buckwheat noodles, an Ômisoka must.

I went home late and returned early the next morning to help with more preparations before Somemaru’s pupils began arriving with their wives and children.

Soon everybody had arrived and the New Year’s banquet was underway. I helped by making sure food and drinks never ran out, and washed a great deal of dishes. Of course I was also allowed to partake in the delicious food and drinks. All of this was wonderful, and the banquet felt like a huge family gathering. Indeed, everybody had a fabulous time, starting off the New Year in grand fashion. I especially enjoyed playing with the children, two of them promising to return to America with me.

The festivities lasted well into the night. I stayed until the end to help clean up, getting home just before midnight. When I looked in the mirror, I realized I still had a smile on my face.

I have a feeling the Year of the Dragon is going to be a special year.

昨年と同じように、大晦日も元旦も染丸師匠のお宅で過ごさせていただきました。とても忙しかったですが、大変楽しいひとときでした。

僕は日本のお正月がとても好きです。なぜかと言うと、多くの家族にとって一体感の強い時期だからです。そして、お店のほとんどが戸締めするのは年内この時期だけで、人々が仕事や家の外の世界よりもっと大事なことを考える余裕ができます。この時期に多くの日本人が神様から新年の恵みをいただくために近くのお寺や神社に飛んで、それぞれの交通安全、恋愛、出産、高校や大学合格、等々のお守りを買い求めます。

毎年放送される大人気音楽番組の最後に行われるカウントダウンを見たら、日本人(あるいはNHK)がお正月をどれほど深く思っているかすぐわかります:10,
9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 . . . 全国の静かで厳粛たる寺々のカット。

事始めがあるので、大晦日と元旦は一大行事とは言えませんが、師匠のお宅では昔から守られてきた習慣に沿って行事を行います。例えば、お節料理を準備し、お屠蘇もいただきます。お弟子さんやお子さんもお年玉をいただき、等々。ここでもやっぱり人々の気持ちの一体感が大事です。僕にとってはこの一体感が一番印象的です。

大晦日に師匠と一緒に40人前くらいのお節の準備の手伝いをさせていただきました。実は、師匠が準備を全て自分でなさって、ほとんど休まずにずっとキッチンにいらっしゃる料理長でいらっしゃいます。師匠はお疲れじゃないかなと思いながら、何回か休憩なさるようお願いしました。本当にお元気ですね、師匠。ある休憩時間に師匠から年越しそばを御馳走になりました。

大晦日の夜に帰り、元旦にお弟子さんとそのご家族がお見えになる前、最後の準備をするため、元旦は早く伺わせていただきました。

間もなく、皆さんがお見えになり、宴会がどんどん盛り上がりました。僕の役割りはそれぞれの食べ物と飲み物が無くならないようにすることと、お皿洗いでした。もちろん、僕も美味しいお節料理とお酒をたっぷりいただけました。いや、本当に楽しくて楽しくて、大きいファミリー・ディナーの様でした。皆さんがとても楽んでいたたようで、一年の始まりとしては、最高でした。最も楽しかったことは、お子さんたちと共に遊んだことで、その中の2人が僕と一緒にアメリカ行くという約束をしてくれました(笑)。

年始会が夜遅くまで行われていて、その後の片付けも手伝わせていただきました。0時前に家に着き、鏡を見ていたら、自分の笑顔がまだまだ残っていることに気づきました。
辰年がとてもスペシャルな一年になる気がします。
Advertisements

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s