Osaka Shitennôji Doyadoya 大阪四天王寺どやどや

20120114-184406.jpg

If you have some free time and happen to be in Osaka, I recommend checking out the Tennôji area. Though the neighborhood  on the immediate south side of Tennôji station has been undergoing a major upgrade (mostly new shopping centers) over the past several years, the stretches north and west of the station still offer some of Osaka’s finest shitamachi (working-class neighborhood) flavor. I absolutely love the people, food, and air here. To me it feels like “real Osaka,” if there is such a thing.

Tennôji is also home to the historic temple Shitennôji, which is dated to the year 593, when Prince Shôtoku, the first great patron of Buddhism in Japan, is believed to have had it constructed. This is also where Tennôji gets its name. Obviously the structures standing in the complex today are not the originals, but it is still a wonderful temple, for ages a favorite religious and entertainment destination.

20120114-184318.jpgI visited the temple today to see for my first time Osaka Shitennôji Doyadoya. According to the City of Osaka website,  Shushôe takes place at the Rokujidô (Pavilion of the Sixth Hour) from New Year’s Day until January 14. During is a period when the entire clergy holds services to pray for peace in the realm and bountiful harvests of the five grains. On the final day, services are held for the Ox god (Goôhô) and paper amulets bearing this seal are sent fluttering from the rafters of the pavilion. A tradition of scrambling to catch these began ages ago and continues to this day. This particular festival is referred to as Doyadoya.

Written in the Edo period, the Settsu meisho zue states, “Shushôe takes place from New Year’s Day to the hour of the Rooster on the fourteenth day…” Doyadoya used to begin at the hour of the Rooster (6:00PM) and amulets bearing the seal of Ox god where released between around 8:00 to 9:00PM, but the time has since been moved to 2:30PM or so, to prevent disorder. Students from the following schools are regular participants: Seiryû Gakuen, Shitennôji Habikio Junior High and High Schools, and Izumi Chairudo Kindergarten.

This is a gallant event in that participants come unclothed to jostle for the hundreds of Ox god talismans sent down from above. Today these are tied to willow branches and taken home, but in years past these branches were believed to ward off pests if planted in rice paddies.  The word Doyadoya is thought to come from a common expression referring to the crowds that noisily flocked (doyadoya to) to the Rokujidô in hopes of winning a talismans bearing the seal of the Ox god.

Especially entertaining are the the teachers, also clad in loincloths, who lead the high-adrenalin exercises through megaphones and hurl water on the young men. The students cry out in the winter cold while the crowd roars with laughter, and perhaps a few sympathetic groans.

It was a great time, and I am glad I went.

20120114-184253.jpg

Since I am on the subject, I also have to mention that Shitennôji, being such an important place in Osaka religious and cultural history, is also the setting of a number of Kamigata rakugo stories. Tennôji mairi (Pilgrimage to [Shi]Tennôji) has to be the best known of these. In this rakugo it is the middle of higan, vernal equinoctial week. A man gets his friend (Jinbei) to join him on a pilgrimage to Shitennôji, saying he wants to have a service held and sound the requiem bell for his recently departed, beloved dog Kuro. Soon, they pass through the fabled stone gateway, and, on Jinbei’s lead, the two proceed on a whirlwind tour through the temple precincts. They come to any number of shops and show-tents (misemono goya), giving listeners a great illustration of the lively place Shitennôji used to be.

What with all the enthusiastic participants and eager crowd, whistles shrilling in unison with manly chants, quality entertainment in an old temple-school tradition, not to mention a crowd of preparatory school and cell phone company representatives stationed outside the temple gate waiting to sweep up students and their families on their way out, I felt momentarily what Shitennôji must have been like in ages past, what a lively place it still is.

もし大阪に立ち寄る機会があったら、天王寺をぶらぶらするのがおすすめです。天王寺駅の南側辺りは、数年前からリニューアル(大体はショッピングモール)されていますが、駅の西と北へ続く道を歩くと大阪ならではの下町の味がまだ残っています。この辺の人、食文化、空気が大好きです。何か、「ほんの大阪」の感じがします。

天王寺というと、やはり四天王寺ですね。この歴史的なお寺は593年にでき、日本における仏教の最初の重要な後援者であった聖徳太子によって建てられたと言われています。天王寺の名前はこのお寺から来ています。もちろん、現在寺内にある建物は建て直されたですが、本当に素敵なお寺で、昔から宗教と娯楽の目的地として愛されてきました。

20120114-184114.jpg今日、初めて「大阪四天王寺どやどや」を観るために四天王寺に行ってきました。大阪市のサイトより:四天王寺の修正会(しゅしょうえ)では、亀の池の前の六時堂において、元旦より14日まで、一山(いっさん)僧侶による天下泰平・五穀豊饒祈願の法要が営まれる。14日の結願の日に、法要中に祈祷された牛王宝印(ごおうほういん)という魔除けの護符を、お堂の縁の天井から撒き、それを奪い合うという風習がいつの頃からか始まり今日まで続いている。この祭りが「どやどや」である。

江戸時代の『摂津名所図会』に「元旦より十四日まで酉の刻六時堂修正会…」とあり、昔は酉の刻(午後6時)から始まり、牛王宝印を投ずるのは夜8時から9時頃になったが、現在は混乱を避けるため、午後2時すぎから、清風学園、四天王寺羽曳丘中・高校、和泉チャイルド幼稚園の生徒たちや園児たちによって行われている。

牛王宝印を押した何百枚もの護符を群衆の中に投じると、それをとろうとして東西より裸の人々がひしめき合う、まことに勇ましい行事である。この護符を柳の枝に差して持ち帰るが、昔はこの枝を稲田に立てておくと、悪虫がつかず豊作になったといわれた。「どやどや」の名称は、俗に牛王宝印を受けんとして、どやどやと六時堂に群衆することから起こったといわれている。

20120114-185034.jpg学生のふんどし姿も面白かったですが、もっと良かったのは先生たちの姿でした!アドレナリンが駆け巡っているような大きな声をさらに拡声器で大きくし、生徒たちに水をかけていました。寒い冬の中、若い男性が叫び、それを見ている観光客は、笑いと一緒にうめき声をあげていました。

今日は本当に楽しくて、行ってきて本当に良かったと思います。

大阪の仏教と文化の歴史にとって、非常に大切なな四天王寺ですが、同時にこのお寺が上方落語のいくつかの噺の背景になっていることも忘れてはいけません。この中でも、「天王寺詣り」が一番よく知られているでしょう。「上方落語家名鑑-第二版」のやまだりよこさんが次のように紹介しています。

彼岸の最中。亡くなった愛犬クロの供養のため陰陽鐘をついてやりたいと、男が甚兵衛を連れ出し四天王寺へとやって来る。石の鳥居をくぐり、甚兵衛の案内で境内をぐるっと巡る二人。多くの店や見世物小屋も出てにぎやかなこと…

本当に、「天王寺詣り」を聴いたら昔の四天王寺はどんなに賑やかな場所だったかよく分かります。

どやどやの熱心な参加者と観光客、ヒューッという笛の音を合図に男らしいかけ声、お寺学校の古い行事にある笑い、そして鳥居の外で生徒やその家族をつかむように待っている塾や携帯電話会社の代表の賑やかさ...これらによって昔の四天王寺の賑やかさをちょっと分かった気がし、まだまだ昔に負けず賑やかなところだということも分かりました。

Advertisements

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s