Penitentiary Rakugo II 刑務所落語 その二

And to the Oregon State Penitentiary I went.

Any chance to put on a kimono and perform rakugo is a great opportunity for me, so I almost didn’t have to think about going on September 21. I was simply happy to be performing rakugo. And, in a way, it was kind of like Johnny Cash going to perform at prisons beginning with Huntsville State in 1954, and more famously Folsom State and San Quentin State Prisons in the late ’60s, both of which resulted with hit songs and albums. So, like Johnny Cash, right?

Okay, maybe not…

Of course, there was no money in this for me, and clearly no hope for commercial success or fame to follow. Just the chance to meet an interesting group of men, and be “Japanese” for a couple of hours. And how rewarding the experience was!

Thanks to the people who organized this show, it was a wonderful and memorable evening. Despite the serious nature of their jobs, Officers Tavera and Blain were remarkably friendly and welcoming. After explaining the rules surrounding my visit, and checking my belongings, they corralled me through a metal detector then through a series of heavy bolted doors. Next, I found myself walking through an inmate compound. I have to admit, I was a somewhat nervous at first, but when I met a few of the men in the group I would be performing for, all that went away. After all, they are people just like me, right? In this, they were more courteous and hospitable than some people on the “outside.”

I soon arrived in the auditorium where I would be performing. I wasn’t there for five minutes when a man walked up with a warm smile and asked, “Would you like a cup of juice, Mr. Shores? How about a cinnamon roll, Mr. Shores?”

“Sure, that would be great,” I answered, grateful. The cinnamon roll he brought must have been as big as my face. What a treat!

A number of other members of the Asia Pacific Family approached me, very friendly and eager to assist. I told them that I didn’t need much help since I only had to set out my zabuton, kendai, and hizakakushi. Their sound technician made sure the microphone was in place, and got the CD ready for cueing.

I changed out of my street clothes into my kimono behind one of the several standing partitions lined up on the stage.

“Shores, we’re going to run ’em in!” Mr. Tavera projected from across the auditorium.

“Thank you.” I replied.

After I finished tying my obi, I waited to be introduced. I peaked through a small gap between two partitions. I guess the nerves were coming back. I didn’t see anybody that looked “mean.” There were no disorderly inmates in need of reprimand. Other than the supervising officers, locked gates, and “prison blue” inmate attire, there was nothing else that made this place stand out as a penitentiary. Maybe this shouldn’t have come as a surprise. No, I did not see inmates sitting before me through the partition gaps. I saw men who looked no different than my friends, brothers, uncles…

Sure, these men were inmates, but they were also people. But the nerves still remained. Oh, yes, I still had something challenging ahead of me. Performing rakugo.

I entered to the to the song Ishidan then proceeded to do my set, which consisted of two stories — Unagiya (The Eel Shop) and Ko wa kasugai (Children are Staples) — and a Q&A session that followed. The audience was very responsive and seemed to enjoy the show. I appreciated their close attention and insightful questions. I also appreciated the opportunity to practice, and introduce an art that almost no one in the room had ever heard of.

Ko wa kasugai is one of Somemaru’s specialty pieces (ohako). It is a tale of deep human emotions and sentiment (ninjôbanashi). Really, it is a quite difficult piece and probably too early for me to be performing it. But I just love this story. The version that Somemaru tells is about a man who is reunited with his son, then later his wife, from whom he has been separated from because, basically, he was was a dysfunctional husband and father. We learn that the man has in his time away made important life changes, and, while the wife may not necessarily be ready for the man to come back into the home, the parents together decide that this may indeed be the best thing for their child. In the touching ending to the story, we realize that, like the title says, children indeed are staples. In a classic, rakugo-style ending, the young boy blurts out, “Oh! That’s why you said you were going to pound me with Daddy’s hammer!”

I shook the hands of numerous thankful men following the show. It was gratifying to see that my visit meant something to them.

“Will you come again?” one man about the same age as me asked.

“Yes, I will,” I told him, and meant it.

After changing clothes, I was allowed 15 minutes to visit with several Asian Pacific Family members. They asked questions about my life, and I asked questions about theirs. I tried to finish the huge cinnamon role they gave me when I first arrived, but couldn’t.

Performing rakugo is challenging, but the hardest thing about my visit was actually leaving, or leaving all the men behind rather. After my belongings were checked a second time, and I retraced my steps through the same heavy doors to freedom, it was hard to leave my new friends behind in the penitentiary. I have no idea what the men are in jail for, or for how long they will be incarcerated, but I hope that they will continue working on their rehabilitation and one earn the opportunity to rejoin regular society. After repaying their debts and making amends, I know each and every one  of them could do something to contribute to the world we live in.

I was incredibly fortunate to be able to perform for the Asian Pacific Family, and share with them Japan’s great comic storytelling art. Rakugo entertains people and makes them laugh, but I also learned on this evening that is makes unique meetings like this possible.

そしてオレゴン州立刑務所へ。

着物を着て、高座で落語をさせていただく機会をいただけるというのは、僕にとってはこの上なくとてもありがたいことで、9月21日の高座も行くかどうかを考える必要はありませんでした。落語を演るチャンスができたので、とても嬉しかったです。まあ、ひょっとしたら、ちょっとジョニー•キャッシュが1954年にハンツビル州立刑務所でライブを演り、その後もっと有名になっていた60年代末にフォルサム州立刑務所、サンクィントン州立刑務所でのコンサートを録音し、それをアルバムにして大ヒットしたみたいな。ちょっとジョニー•キャッシュと同じような感じでしょう。

ほんなわけないかっ…

僕が刑務所で落語を演らせていただくことに、もちろん、お金はいただきませんでした。終わったあとお金持ちになる可能性も有名になる可能性もないです。しかし、その代わりに興味深い方々と出会えたし、二時間ほど「日本人」(変な外人?)になることもできました。まことにためになる経験でした。

ショーの主催者たちのおかげで、本当に素敵で想い出に残るような夜となりました。日頃かなり厳しい仕事をしているにも関わらず、タベラ刑務官とブレイン刑務官がとても親しみやすくて、歓迎してくださいました。滞在に関する規則を説明し、持ち込み荷物を調べた後、金属探知器で調べられ、重たい差し錠を掛けたドアを何個も通り、中に案内されました。そして、収容所の中を歩いていきました。正直に言えば、最初はちょっと緊張しました。しかし、落語を聴きに来てくれた人たちに会ってから安心しました。どっちみち、僕たちは同じ人間ではありませんか。それに、いわゆる「外」(一般社会)にいる人に対して、丁寧で好意をもって受け入れてくださいました。

間もなく、会場に到着しました。5分も経っていないうち、ある人が「ショアーズ様、ジュースはいかがでしょうか、シナモンロールを召し上がりませんか」と親切に聞いてくださいました。「あっ、ありがとうございます、いただきます」とありがたくいただきました。実は、そのシナモンロールが僕の顔ほど大きかったです。嬉しかったな~。

アジアン•パシフィック•ファミリーのメンバーの方々ともお会いし、みなさんとても親切な方々でした。座布団、見台と膝隠ししかないので、事前の準備はあまりすることがありませんでした。出囃子などはCDだったので、サークルのサウンドテクニシャンがマイクなどをセットアップしてくださいました。

「オイッ、ショアーズ!皆連れて入るど~!」とタベラ刑務官が会場の向こうから声をかけました。

「ありがとうございま~す。」

帯を締めた後、紹介されるまで舞台袖で待っていました。パーティションのすき間から客席を覗いてみました。緊張感が戻ってきました。でも、客席に座っている皆さんの顔に意地悪そうな表情は一つもありませんでした。その場を取り乱すような、治安紊乱受刑者もいませんでした。刑務官たちの存在や、鍵のかかった門扉、青色の囚人服がなければ、この場所は刑務所であるということを忘れてしまうほどです。まあ、これは驚くほどのことではなかったかもしれません。いや、パーティションのすき間から見ていたのは受刑者ではなかったです。自分の友人、兄弟、おじさんたちとそんなに変わらない男の人たちでした。

この方々が受刑者だと分かっていましたが、「渡る世間に鬼はない」というわけで、心を持った人間でもありました。それにしても、まだ緊張していました。なぜなら、もう一つの大きいなチャレンジが残っていたからです。それは落語を披露することです。

「石段」という出囃子で高座にあがって、二席行ないました。一席目は「うなぎ屋」で、二席目は「子は鎹」でした。最後にQ&Aもさせていただきました。皆さん、噺をよく聴いてくださいましたし、鋭い質問もしてくださいました。落語を聴いたことのない方々に落語を紹介できたことを心よりありがたく思っています。

「子は鎹」は染丸師匠の十八番で、とても深い人情噺です。本当は、このネタは僕にはまだまだ早いと思います。でも、この噺が大好きです。師匠が語るバージョンでは主人公は機能障害で妻、そして息子と離れないといけませんが、ある日その息子(熊ちゃん)に偶然に会う。その後、別居中の妻にも会う(会わせると言った方が正しい)。そのうち、主人公が頑張って良い人間に変身できたことが分かり、妻は心の準備はできていなかったが、子供のために一緒に頑張ろうとする。最後は、胸を引き裂くような終わりに、その妻・母が「ほんまに夫婦の仲の子は鎹とはええことがいうてある」と言いますが、それを落とすのが熊ちゃんの「道理でお父ちゃん、玄能でたたくと言うた」という台詞。

ショーが終わると感謝の言葉を言ってくださる方々と握手し、皆さんが喜んでくださっていたのがわかりました。とても嬉しかったです。

「また来ますか」と僕とほぼ同い年ぐらいの人が聞きました。

「はい、来ますよ」と約束しました。

着替えた後、アジア・パシフィック・ファミリーのメンバーと15分ほど、もう少しお話をしました。彼らは僕の人生について質問し、僕も彼らの生活について質問しました。シナモンロールの残りを食べきろうとしてみましたが、やっぱり無理でした。

落語はとてもチャレジングでしたが、この日最も難しかったのは、帰ることというより、聴いてくださった皆さんをおいて帰ることでした。荷物を再び調べられ、同じ重たいドアを通って逆戻りして、自由の社会へ。新しい友達を刑務所において帰ることは寂しかったです。皆さん、何をして刑務所に入ることになったのか、理由も実刑判決の長さも分かりませんが、これからもリハビリを続けて、いつか自由の社会に戻せてもらえるように頑張ってほしいです。自分の犯した罪の償いをし、いつか一人一人がこの「渡る世間」に貢献できると強く思っています。

アジアン・パシフィック・ファミリーの前で落語ができ、日本の滑稽話芸を紹介できたので、僕はとてもラッキーでした。落語というものは人を喜ばせたり笑わせたりすることですが、今回学んだのは落語がとてもスペシャルな出会いも生んでくれるということです。

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Penitentiary Rakugo II 刑務所落語 その二

  1. Hello,

    Came to your site and your art through the research for a viable renku stanza. I’d love to learn more – will visit again.

Comments コメント

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s