Katsura Harukoma: RIP 春駒師匠、合掌

Katsura Harukoma, property of http://fumikyou.seesaa.net/archives/200902-1.htmlI was sad the other day when I read the news that Katsura Harukoma (62) died of liver failure. I have a number of memories of Harukoma, the most memorable being the first time I met him at the Rengatei chi’ki yose held at the Fûgetsudō Hall in Motomachi (Kobe).

I followed Somemaru into the dressing room and got a glare from Harukoma that seemed to say, “what the hell is this foreigner doing here.” Honestly, I was scared of him. I was even more scared when Somemaru went to the restroom and left me alone with Harukoma in the dressing room. I then realized that I hadn’t given him a proper greeting. “Pardon me,” I said sheepishly, “My name is Matt — I am an exchange student from America. I am studying rakugo under Somemaru.”

With this he said “good work” and gave me a little envelope with money in it (goshûgibukuro). He was scary at first, but I could see that he could also be kind.

Another memory I have of Harukoma is when I was at Somemaru’s one day and the phone rang. I was the only person in the room, so I grabbed Somemaru’s schedule book, a pencil, and some paper. This was my first time to answer Somemaru’s telephone.

Something, something something, can he make it on May 26th?” gurgled the voice on the other end of the line.

“Yes, that day looks like its open,” I replied, but before I could get the name of the man or venue, he hung up.

Just at that moment, Somemaru came into the room.

“Who called?”

“Uh…”

“Huh? There was a call wasn’t there?”

“Yes.”

“Who was it?”

“Well… I’m not quite sure.”

“What? You were just talking to them. Was it about a job?”

“Yes, maybe… They asked if you could make it on May 26th.”

“Harukoma?”

“Um… yes, perhaps.”

I think this was the only time I got in trouble with Somemaru.

After this incident I met Harukoma a number of times in places like dressing rooms, so I confirmed the voice on the phone that I couldn’t comprehend was indeed Harukoma’s. Although I made myself a nuisance to him, he was always nice to me. For this I am grateful. It is truly sad that we can no longer listen to his rakugo live.

Rest in peace.

Katsura Harukoma, property of Katsura Harukoma, http://www.oct.zaq.ne.jp/katsuraharukoma/先日、桂春駒師匠が肝不全でお亡くなりになったというニュースを読んだとき、悲しかったです。春駒師匠との想い出はいくつかありますが、最も印象的なのは神戸元町の「神戸凬月堂ホール」で行われた恋雅亭という寄席で初めてお会いしたときのことです。

染丸師匠について楽屋に入ってから、春駒師匠が「なんで外人がおるねん」と言いたげな睨みつきだったので、怖かったです。染丸師匠がお手洗いに行っている間に春駒師匠と二人きりになって、もっと怖かったです。あっ、まだちゃんとした挨拶をしていないと思ったので、こう言いました。「失礼します、私はアメリカから来た留学生でマットと申します。染丸師匠のもとで落語を研究させていただいております。」

すると、春駒師匠が「ご苦労さん」とおっしゃり、ご祝儀袋を渡してくださいました。最初は怖かったですが、優しい方だなと思いました。

Motomachi Yose Rengatei, property of Katsura Harukoma, http://www.oct.zaq.ne.jp/katsuraharukoma/もう一つの想い出は、染丸師匠のお宅で受けた電話でした。僕しかいなかったので、電話がなったとき師匠の手帳、鉛筆、そして紙を取って、初めて師匠の電話に出てみました。

「なんやらかんやら、5月26日はいけるか。」

「はい。その日は空いてそうです…」と言い、まだお名前や会場を聞かないうちに話している方が電話を切ってしまいました。

ちょうどそのとき染丸師匠が現れました。

「電話誰やった?」

「えぇ…」

「え?電話があったやろ?」

「はい。」

「だれやった?」

「それは、ちょっと分かりません…」

「へ?今喋ったがな。仕事の電話だった?」

「えぇ、多分。5月26日いけるかと言いまして。」

「春駒か。」

「えぃとゥ、多分そうです。」

染丸師匠に怒られたのは、確かにこのときだけでした。

その後も何度か楽屋などで春駒師匠にお会いしましたが、電話で聞き取れなかったお声は確かに春駒師匠のお声でした。ご迷惑をおかけしてしまったのに、優しくしてくださったので感謝しています。もう春駒師匠の落語を生で聴けないことが本当に残念です。

合掌。

Luring In Audiences 呼び込み

I am not a professional rakugo storyteller.

However, when I have opportunities to perform, I get an idea what professionals must have to go through from time to time — particularly those younger hanashika still working to build a fan base.

On Saturday, I went to the theater where I was to perform rakugo. It was my first time performing at this particular venue. I found my dressing room without too much trouble, changed into my kimono, and proceeded to the backstage area five minutes before going on.

Two very friendly stagehands put out my zabuton, kendai, and hizakakushi. As the time to enter time drew near, I noticed there was almost no sound coming from the audience. Perhaps two people conversing quietly…

“Have they opened the doors yet?” I asked the stagehands.

“Um, I’m not sure. It doesn’t sound like it…” one replied. “Do you happen to know where the emcee is?” he continued, asking me.

WHAT! Do I know where the emcee is?! How would I know where the emcee is? I started to get a touch worried.

“Well, I do have a tuxedo-like jacket,” the other stagehand kindly offered, “I suppose I could introduce you.”

Yet, there was almost nobody in the audience. This reminded me of a story that a pro hanashika once told me about having to do rakugo for just one person. “At least I have two,” I tried to comfort myself.

Fortunately, I had the cell phone number of the woman who invited me to perform. I called her.

“Hello, this is Matt.” I said very calmly.

“Hello, Matt? Are you there now?” she asked.

“Yes, it looks like we are running 15 minutes behind.” I told her as casually as possible. “You wouldn’t happen to know where the emcee is, would you? He’s missing.” I continued.

“Oh he’s here with me,” she said almost as casually. “I’ll send him over.”

A very good idea.

I figured it would take the emcee at least five minutes to arrive and get situated. I recalled that there were about 100 people outside on my way into the theater. I decided to run out to invite them in to listen to rakugo.

Good afternoon, everyone! What a beautiful day it is today!” I projected as best I could across the large square. “And what a beautiful day to share a few laughs! Won’t you come inside to hear me perform rakugo, Japanese comic storytelling? The show will start momentarily, and it will be in English!”

I approached every group and individual that I could find, then ran back into the theater. Almost as soon as I returned backstage my entrance music (Ishidan) began playing.

I entered, kneeled on the zabuton, and bowed. I clacked the kobyôshi on the kendai to get started and was thrilled to see 15 people already in the audience. As I progressed through my makura intro, more people made their way in, bringing the total to 50 or so.

I was so grateful that they came!

The story (“Morning Toiletries” Chôzu mawashi) went well. I had so much fun with this wonderful audience that my 45-minute set was over in the blink of an eye.

On this day I had to go outside of the venue to work for my audience. I beckoned people to come in and see me perform. This was a first for me.

It soon dawned on me that this is what many hanashika–especially young ones–have to do on a regular basis.

I learned from this that winning an audience is not easy, even if the show is free. This must especially be the case for professionals, who not only ask for time but also the cost of a ticket. This is how hanashika make their living. Hanashika therefore have to stay hungry, humble, train hard to be more interesting than rival entertainers, and foster relationships in and outside the yose.

I am glad that I was able to experience having to work for my audience on Saturday. I gained further respect for hanashika who wake up every day to devise new ways to win new fans and keep them coming back for more.

僕はプロの噺家ではありません。

しかし、落語を演る機会があると、プロ(特にファン層を増やそうとしている若手)が普段経験していることが分かるようなときもあります。

土曜日に落語をさせていただきましたが、その会場は初めてでした。無事に楽屋に入り、着物に着替えて、出番5分前に舞台の袖へ進みました。

とても親切な舞台係がいまして、座布団、見台、膝隠しを出していてくださいました。そして高座の時間が近づくと、客席からほとんど音がしないことに気づきました。ただ二人の観客が静かに話をしているような閑散さ。

「開場はまだでしょうか」と舞台係に聞いてみました。

「あのぉ、ちょっとわかりません。まだですねぇ。」とその人は返事をし、逆に僕に「ところで、司会はどこへ行ったか分かりますでしょうか。」と聞いてきました。

え~?!なぜ僕が…? 司会がどこに行ったかなんて分かりませんよ~。分かるわけないでしょ~。徐々に心配になってきました。

そしてもう一人の舞台係が「いやぁ、私、タキシードのようなジャケットがあって、あれでしたら、私が司会役をできないこともないですが… 」と言いました。優しい方ですけどね。

しかし、客席にはほとんど人はいません。あるプロの噺家から聞いた話を思い出しました。以前落語会でお客さんが一人しか来場しなかったときがあって、とはいえ落語を演らないわけにもいかないので、そのままマンツーマンで演ったそうです。「まぁ、僕の場合は少なくとも2人いるからねぇ。」と自らを慰めました。

幸い、担当者の方の携帯電話の番号を持ってきていたので、かけてみました。

「もしもし、こちらは本日落語をさせていただくマットと申します」と落ち着いて言いました。

「あ、マットさん、どうも。もう着きましたか。」

「はい、舞台の方は15分ほど遅れているそうですが…」とできるだけ平静を保って言ってみました。そして、「あの… 司会の方は、どちらにいらっしゃるかお分かりでしょうか。こちらにはいらっしゃらないんですが… 」

「あ、はいはい、司会はですね、今私のところにいます。」先方は全然慌てる様子がありません。「そちらに向かうように言っておきますね」と。

それはとてもいいアイディア…

司会が来て全てが整うまで5分ぐらいかかると思い、何とかお客さんを増やす方法はないかと考えました。確かに会場の表の広場に100人ぐらいいたので、外に向かって飛び出しました。そして呼び込みをすることを決意しました。

「皆様、こんにちは!本日は本当に気持ちのいいお天気ですね~!」できるだけ大きな声で繰り返しました。「こんな素敵な日に一緒に笑えたら最高ですね!これから、僕のラクゴ (ジャパニーズ スタイル ストーリーテリング)を聴いてくださいませんか~。英語で演りますが、間もなく始まりま~す。ぜひ、中の方へどうぞ~!」

広場にいた人々、一人一人に声をかけてからまた中へ急いで入りました。舞台の袖に着いた突端、出囃子「石段」が流れてきました。

舞台に出て、座布団に座って、お辞儀。見台に小拍子を叩いて、始めようとしたら、客席にもう15人ほど増えたことに気づきました。マクラを続けているうちにお客さんがどんどん入ってきて、結局50ぐらい入ってくださいました。

わぁ~、こんな嬉しいことはないなあ。

噺(手水廻し)は何とかうまくいき、お客さんは本当に良いお客さんでめっちゃ楽しかったです。45分の出番だったんですが、あっという間でした。

今回は今までと違い、高座の直前に外に出てお客さんが入ってくださるように自ら誘い込みをしました。このような呼び込みは、もちろん、初めての経験でした。

そして終わった後、あることに気づきました。(特に若手)噺家は定期的に呼び込みなどをしないといけないということです。

僕もこういう経験ができたおかげで、とても勉強になりました。例えば、イベントが無料でも、必ずしもお客さんがいるということは当たり前ではありません。プロの噺家の場合はもっと難しいと思います。なぜならば、お客さんの時間だけではなく、普段はお金を払っていただき、落語を商売にしているからです。ですから、噺家は出来るだけ謙虚でいながら、熱心に活躍しないといけません。また周りのライバル芸人にも負けず、より面白くなるように練習しないといけません。寄席内、寄席外の人間関係にも気をつけないといけないので、とても大変だと思います。

先日のような経験ができ、本当によかったです。噺家さんに対する尊敬の念を改めて強くした一日でした。

Ômisoka&Gantan 大晦日&元旦

Just like last year, this year I spent Ômisoka (December 31) and Gantan (January 1) at Somemaru’s house. This is a very busy, but very enjoyable time of the year.

One reason I like New Year (Oshôgatsu) in Japan is that it is a time of togetherness for most families. It is the one time of year when the majority of stores close and people are able to focus on things other than work and the commercial world outside their doors. This is also a time when a good deal of the country flocks to local temples and shrines for New Year’s blessings, buying amulets for any number of things, such as commuter safety, help finding true love, having successful childbirth, passing high school and college entrance exams, and so on.

One soon learns that Japanese people (or at least NHK) take Oshôgatsu seriously when they observe the way the wildly popular annual music program Kôhaku uta gassen comes to a sudden, anticlimactic end at Countdown: 10, 9. 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1… CUT TO QUIET, SOLEMN SHOTS OF TEMPLES AROUND THE NATION.

Ômisoka and Gantan at Somemaru’s are not exactly solemn, but he does adhere to old customs as far as food (osechi) preparation and ceremonial sake (otoso) pouring goes. Pupils in training and children receive money gifts (otoshidama), and the list of customs followed goes on. Again, togetherness is key. This is the best thing about the holiday.

On Ômisoka I spent the entire day assisting Somemaru with osechi preparation, making enough food for about 40 people. Somemaru does all the cooking himself, working all day in the kitchen, hardly taking a break. Actually, I had to remind him to take a break from time to time. On one of our breaks we enjoyed toshikoshi soba, long buckwheat noodles, an Ômisoka must.

I went home late and returned early the next morning to help with more preparations before Somemaru’s pupils began arriving with their wives and children.

Soon everybody had arrived and the New Year’s banquet was underway. I helped by making sure food and drinks never ran out, and washed a great deal of dishes. Of course I was also allowed to partake in the delicious food and drinks. All of this was wonderful, and the banquet felt like a huge family gathering. Indeed, everybody had a fabulous time, starting off the New Year in grand fashion. I especially enjoyed playing with the children, two of them promising to return to America with me.

The festivities lasted well into the night. I stayed until the end to help clean up, getting home just before midnight. When I looked in the mirror, I realized I still had a smile on my face.

I have a feeling the Year of the Dragon is going to be a special year.

昨年と同じように、大晦日も元旦も染丸師匠のお宅で過ごさせていただきました。とても忙しかったですが、大変楽しいひとときでした。

僕は日本のお正月がとても好きです。なぜかと言うと、多くの家族にとって一体感の強い時期だからです。そして、お店のほとんどが戸締めするのは年内この時期だけで、人々が仕事や家の外の世界よりもっと大事なことを考える余裕ができます。この時期に多くの日本人が神様から新年の恵みをいただくために近くのお寺や神社に飛んで、それぞれの交通安全、恋愛、出産、高校や大学合格、等々のお守りを買い求めます。

毎年放送される大人気音楽番組の最後に行われるカウントダウンを見たら、日本人(あるいはNHK)がお正月をどれほど深く思っているかすぐわかります:10,
9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 . . . 全国の静かで厳粛たる寺々のカット。

事始めがあるので、大晦日と元旦は一大行事とは言えませんが、師匠のお宅では昔から守られてきた習慣に沿って行事を行います。例えば、お節料理を準備し、お屠蘇もいただきます。お弟子さんやお子さんもお年玉をいただき、等々。ここでもやっぱり人々の気持ちの一体感が大事です。僕にとってはこの一体感が一番印象的です。

大晦日に師匠と一緒に40人前くらいのお節の準備の手伝いをさせていただきました。実は、師匠が準備を全て自分でなさって、ほとんど休まずにずっとキッチンにいらっしゃる料理長でいらっしゃいます。師匠はお疲れじゃないかなと思いながら、何回か休憩なさるようお願いしました。本当にお元気ですね、師匠。ある休憩時間に師匠から年越しそばを御馳走になりました。

大晦日の夜に帰り、元旦にお弟子さんとそのご家族がお見えになる前、最後の準備をするため、元旦は早く伺わせていただきました。

間もなく、皆さんがお見えになり、宴会がどんどん盛り上がりました。僕の役割りはそれぞれの食べ物と飲み物が無くならないようにすることと、お皿洗いでした。もちろん、僕も美味しいお節料理とお酒をたっぷりいただけました。いや、本当に楽しくて楽しくて、大きいファミリー・ディナーの様でした。皆さんがとても楽んでいたたようで、一年の始まりとしては、最高でした。最も楽しかったことは、お子さんたちと共に遊んだことで、その中の2人が僕と一緒にアメリカ行くという約束をしてくれました(笑)。

年始会が夜遅くまで行われていて、その後の片付けも手伝わせていただきました。0時前に家に着き、鏡を見ていたら、自分の笑顔がまだまだ残っていることに気づきました。
辰年がとてもスペシャルな一年になる気がします。

Christmas Carving クリスマス木彫り

This year I enjoyed another Christmas Eve at Somemaru’s house.

During the day I helped with some cleaning and decorated Somemaru’s balcony with Christmas lights.

As evening approached, we turned on the Christmas lights, and prepared dinner, which included an appetizer of fried chicken, a longtime Christmas favorite in Japan thanks to the marketing department at Kentucky Fried Chicken.

The main dish was Hayashi-ya Rice, or hashed beef over rice, Somemaru-style. We began properly too; with sparkling wine and a toast.

And of course, after dinner came Christmas cake and tea.

As it is finally complete after several months of work, I chose this day to give Somemaru his wood carving. He seemed to like it, and that made me truly happy. (See below for captioned  photos of the carving.)

Somemaru also gave me a thoughtful gift this evening: a signed paperboard (shikishi) with a personalized greeting that reads, Matô ni ikiru shiawase (Happiness is living the way you see fit). [This is also a play on my name: Happiness is living like Matt.] 

Somemaru shishô, thank you for making Christmas special this year too.

今年も師匠のお宅で素敵なクリスマス・イーブを過ごさせていただきました。

昼間はちょっとした掃除をし、師匠のバルコニーにクリスマスのイルミネーションを飾り付けました。

夕方になってくると、イルミネーションをつけて、夕飯の準備に入りました。前菜がフライドチキンでした。

ケンタッキーフライドチキンのマーケティング部のおかげか、何十年前から日本のクリスマスと言えばチキンだというように、懐かしく感じられ、本当に愛されています。

今晩のメインは師匠の看板メニューであるハヤシヤ(林家)ライスでした。師匠がとてもおしゃれな方で、食べる前にスパーケリングワインで乾杯させていただきました。

その後、もちろん、クリスマスケーキと紅茶を。

数ヶ月前より削ってまいりました木彫りの作品がや

っと出来上がりましたので、今晩師匠にお渡しする事にしました。師匠が気に入ってくださった様で、僕はとても嬉しかったです。(作品の写真と説明を下にご覧ください。)

木彫りをお渡しした後、師匠がとても心のこめたプレゼントをくださいました。サインと千社札付きの色紙ですが、素敵なメッセージも書いてくださいました:「まとうに生きる幸せ。」

染丸師匠、今年もクリスマスをスペシャルにしてくださり、本当にどうもありがとうございました。

    

For Water Boiling 水だき用

The Japanese language is hard. I am reminded of this fact every day. No matter how much I learn, there is always more learn. Speaking, reading comprehension, composition…

I enjoy the challenge of Japanese though, I really do.

This week, on Wednesday, I spent the day at Somemaru’s house. After a day of shamisen lessons, he said he wanted to make nabe (hot pot). He wrote out a list of ingredients and sent me shopping. I could read everything on the list, so no questions asked. I was on my way.

I got to the supermarket and started putting ingredients into my basket one by one, beginning with the vegetables: 1/2 head of hakusai (Chinese cabbage); one bunch of kikuna (garland chrysanthemum — Japanese greens); one tub of shiitake mushrooms; 1/2 daikon radish, the lower half; one bunch of shironegi (leeks).

Next, one tub of kinugoshi (silk-strained) tofu, sliced; one pack of kuzukiri (arrowroot noodles).

Next, raw oysters, two packs.

And finally, 400 grams of thinly sliced pork loin, mizudaki yô

Mizudaki yô? Huh? “For mizudaki?” … “For water daki?” … daki… “burn?” … “boil?” “For water boiling…?” Ugh.

I asked a young part-timer, stocking meat nearby.

MATT: Excuse me. Is this pork loin here mizudaki yô?

PART-TIMER: Mizudaki yô?

MATT: Yes. Mizudaki yô. See, it’s written right here.

PART-TIMER: I’ll be right back, sir.

Off the young man goes, soon to return with an older employee. I pick up the pork loin Somemaru always buys for nabe.

EMPLOYEE: Hi, you’re having nabe right?

MATT: Yes, that’s right.

EMPLOYEE: What you have there is fine.

MATT: This is mizudaki yô?

EMPLOYEE: Yes.

MATT: Thank you.

I paid for the groceries and hurried back to Somemaru’s. On my way I smiled and thought to myself, if Japanese language is difficult for even Japanese people, I have a LONG way to go.

I promise to always remember my learning experiences, and show compassion to my Japanese language students in the future…

The first entry for “mizudaki” in the Kôjien dictionary (electronic version): Nabe ryôri no isshu (one type of nabe cuisine).

日本語は難しいです。毎日この事実に気づきます。いくら学んでも、学び足りません。話すこと、読解作文...

しかし、日本語にあるチャレンジが好きです。本当に。

今週の水曜日に師匠のお宅に伺わせていただきました。一日の三味線のお稽古が終わると、鍋にしょうかと師匠がおっしゃいました。お買い物のリストを書き、僕にお渡ししました。お書きになった材料を全て読めたので、そのまま質問せずにスーパーに向かいました。

スーパーに着きますと、材料を一つずつ籠に入れ始めました。まずはお野菜:白菜 半切、菊菜 1、しいたけ 1、大根 下半分、白ねぎ 1。

続きまして、絹ごし(切れたやつ) 1、くずきり 1。

次は、かき 2袋。

そして、最後に豚ロース 水だき用 400g

え?水だき用?用=for … For 水だき? 水=water … For water だき?… 焚き?炊き?For water boiling? わっ。

すぐ近くにお肉を仕入れている若いアルバイトに聞いてみることにしました。

マット:「すみません。この豚ロースは水だき用ですか。」

アルバイト:「水だき用?」

マット:「はい、水だき用。ここに書いていますが。」

アルバイト:「少々お待ちください。」

すると、アルバイトが消えますが、間もなく年上の店員さんを連れてきます。僕、師匠がいつも鍋にお買いになる豚ロースを手に取ります。

店員さん:「鍋でっか。」

マット:「はい、そうなんです。」

店員さん:「それでいいですよ。」

マット:「これは水だき用ですか。」

店員さん:「はい、そうですよ。」

マット:「えらいすいません。」

レジでお支払いをして、師匠のお宅へ急いで戻りました。その途中で、微笑みながら、「日本人にも日本語が難しかったら、僕はこれからやなあ」と思いました。

それぞれの学習体験を身につけて、将来の日本語の学生に同情することを約束します。

広辞苑(電子版)の中、「水炊き」の第一定義:鍋料理の一種。