Katsura Harukoma: RIP 春駒師匠、合掌

Katsura Harukoma, property of http://fumikyou.seesaa.net/archives/200902-1.htmlI was sad the other day when I read the news that Katsura Harukoma (62) died of liver failure. I have a number of memories of Harukoma, the most memorable being the first time I met him at the Rengatei chi’ki yose held at the Fûgetsudō Hall in Motomachi (Kobe).

I followed Somemaru into the dressing room and got a glare from Harukoma that seemed to say, “what the hell is this foreigner doing here.” Honestly, I was scared of him. I was even more scared when Somemaru went to the restroom and left me alone with Harukoma in the dressing room. I then realized that I hadn’t given him a proper greeting. “Pardon me,” I said sheepishly, “My name is Matt — I am an exchange student from America. I am studying rakugo under Somemaru.”

With this he said “good work” and gave me a little envelope with money in it (goshûgibukuro). He was scary at first, but I could see that he could also be kind.

Another memory I have of Harukoma is when I was at Somemaru’s one day and the phone rang. I was the only person in the room, so I grabbed Somemaru’s schedule book, a pencil, and some paper. This was my first time to answer Somemaru’s telephone.

Something, something something, can he make it on May 26th?” gurgled the voice on the other end of the line.

“Yes, that day looks like its open,” I replied, but before I could get the name of the man or venue, he hung up.

Just at that moment, Somemaru came into the room.

“Who called?”

“Uh…”

“Huh? There was a call wasn’t there?”

“Yes.”

“Who was it?”

“Well… I’m not quite sure.”

“What? You were just talking to them. Was it about a job?”

“Yes, maybe… They asked if you could make it on May 26th.”

“Harukoma?”

“Um… yes, perhaps.”

I think this was the only time I got in trouble with Somemaru.

After this incident I met Harukoma a number of times in places like dressing rooms, so I confirmed the voice on the phone that I couldn’t comprehend was indeed Harukoma’s. Although I made myself a nuisance to him, he was always nice to me. For this I am grateful. It is truly sad that we can no longer listen to his rakugo live.

Rest in peace.

Katsura Harukoma, property of Katsura Harukoma, http://www.oct.zaq.ne.jp/katsuraharukoma/先日、桂春駒師匠が肝不全でお亡くなりになったというニュースを読んだとき、悲しかったです。春駒師匠との想い出はいくつかありますが、最も印象的なのは神戸元町の「神戸凬月堂ホール」で行われた恋雅亭という寄席で初めてお会いしたときのことです。

染丸師匠について楽屋に入ってから、春駒師匠が「なんで外人がおるねん」と言いたげな睨みつきだったので、怖かったです。染丸師匠がお手洗いに行っている間に春駒師匠と二人きりになって、もっと怖かったです。あっ、まだちゃんとした挨拶をしていないと思ったので、こう言いました。「失礼します、私はアメリカから来た留学生でマットと申します。染丸師匠のもとで落語を研究させていただいております。」

すると、春駒師匠が「ご苦労さん」とおっしゃり、ご祝儀袋を渡してくださいました。最初は怖かったですが、優しい方だなと思いました。

Motomachi Yose Rengatei, property of Katsura Harukoma, http://www.oct.zaq.ne.jp/katsuraharukoma/もう一つの想い出は、染丸師匠のお宅で受けた電話でした。僕しかいなかったので、電話がなったとき師匠の手帳、鉛筆、そして紙を取って、初めて師匠の電話に出てみました。

「なんやらかんやら、5月26日はいけるか。」

「はい。その日は空いてそうです…」と言い、まだお名前や会場を聞かないうちに話している方が電話を切ってしまいました。

ちょうどそのとき染丸師匠が現れました。

「電話誰やった?」

「えぇ…」

「え?電話があったやろ?」

「はい。」

「だれやった?」

「それは、ちょっと分かりません…」

「へ?今喋ったがな。仕事の電話だった?」

「えぇ、多分。5月26日いけるかと言いまして。」

「春駒か。」

「えぃとゥ、多分そうです。」

染丸師匠に怒られたのは、確かにこのときだけでした。

その後も何度か楽屋などで春駒師匠にお会いしましたが、電話で聞き取れなかったお声は確かに春駒師匠のお声でした。ご迷惑をおかけしてしまったのに、優しくしてくださったので感謝しています。もう春駒師匠の落語を生で聴けないことが本当に残念です。

合掌。

Advertisements

To Master’s House 師匠のお宅へ

Front door at Somemaru'sThe most important part of this short trip to Osaka is to pay a visit to master Somemaru.

He had time yesterday, so I went to see him at his house. It was wonderful to see him in person, to see him smile and laugh. We talked about many things rakugo-related and not, and he gave me advice on a lot of matters.

Around 5pm he asked me to pull his car around, then we drove to the supermarket. We selected ingredients for nabe (hotpot), then headed home. Just like old times, we prepared dinner together.

Someya arrived just in time for dinner. The three of us talked about a lot and enjoyed many laughs while eating. Somemaru and Someya shared some of their views on performing rakugo, in fact said some things that made me change the way I look at the art, reconsider the way I will approach it as an amateur performer in the future.

Toward the end of dinner, the conversation moved to the topic of Someya’s momentous name change (shûmei) to Hayashiya Kikumaru III next September. He asked Somemaru for advice on a number of matters, and I was able to see that shûmei are not simply ceremonies that people attend.

There is so much to think about and prepare, the simplest of matters perhaps being selecting a design for one’s new tenugui (hand towel), of which hundreds are made and given as formal gifts to other professionals and fans.

Somemaru and Someya looking at tenuguiLast night we spent a good deal of time looking through traditional tenugui pattern books and at actual tenugui, of which Somemaru has an impressive collection. Someya did not make a final decision, but said he would like to keep his new design simple and perhaps include a traditional tenugui chrysanthemum design if he can find one–this would represent the Kiku part of his new name. Nice!

Speaking of tenugui, Someya was very kind to present me with one of his own Hayashiya Someya tenugui, which are quickly becoming a rare item. He also gave me a nice brochure about his shûmei, which Yoshimoto prepared for distribution at a recent press conference.

We topped off the evening with tea and ice cream. Someya and I bowed to Somemaru and thanked him for dinner and everything else, then we were on our way. We took the same train toward Umeda then later said our goodbyes.

Shortly thereafter, I reached into my coat pocket to get some eye drops, and what did I find? Somemaru’s CAR KEY! WHAT!! I forgot to return it after driving to the supermarket. I gasped and looked at my watch, but it was too late in the evening to return to Somemaru’s.

So, this morning I made another trip to Somemaru’s house to return his car key and sheepishly apologize. When Somemaru saw me he smiled and said, “Okay, no worries.” I guess my thick-headed mistake gave me another opportunity to thank him for such nice day yesterday.

今回の大阪での滞在の中で、最も大事なことは染丸師匠にご挨拶することです。

昨日、師匠のお宅に伺わせていただきました。久しぶりに直接お会いでき、再び師匠の笑顔を見て、笑い声を聞けて、本当にうれしい気持ちでいっぱいでした。落語をはじめ、さまざまなお話しができ、また貴重なアドバイスまでもいただきました。

午後5時ぐらいになると、「車を取ってき、買い物に行こう」と師匠がおっしゃって、二人でスーパーマーケットへ。鍋の材料を選び、またお宅の方へ。以前と同じように、ご一緒に晩御飯の準備を。

ちょうど鍋ができはじめたころ、染弥さんもお見えになりました。それから三人で鍋を食べながらいろいろなお話をして、たくさん笑いました。落語のお話しもたくさんでき、師匠そして染弥さんから落語の演出に関してのご意見までも聞かせていただきました。僕の落語に対する見方、そして素人落語家としてのこれからの演出法を変えるほどの貴重なお話しでした。

食事も終わりに近づいた頃、来年9月の「染弥改メ 三代目林家菊丸」の襲名についてのお話になりました。襲名は、お客さまに披露するためであるのはもちろん、そのためにさまざまな準備があるということがわかりました。

例えば、襲名の記念に、新しい手ぬぐいをデザインし、噺家さんやお客さんなどに何百枚もお渡しするそうですが、その準備もしなくてはいけません。

食事の後に、私たちは手ぬぐいの見本帳、そして師匠の手ぬぐい(沢山お持ちです!)を見まながらデザインについて話しました。染弥さんは、シンプルなデザインに、伝統的な手ぬぐいに使われていたような菊の模様があれば、それを活かしたいとおっしゃっていました。林家菊丸の「菊」ですね。かっこいいですねぇ。

手ぬぐいの話ですが、僕も昨日染弥さんから、間もなくなくなる貴重な「林家染弥」の手ぬぐいをいただきました。とっても嬉しかったです。それだけでなく、先月の襲名発表記者会見のために吉本興業が用意したパンフレットまでも記念にくださいました。本当にどうもありがとうございました!

最後に、紅茶とアイスクリームをいただき、染弥さんと一緒に師匠にお辞儀をしまして、その日は失礼させていただきました。駅に向かって、同じ梅田方面の電車に乗り、その後お別れしました。

一人になって、コートのポケットの中から目薬を取ろうと思った時、何が出たと思いますか?いやッ、師匠の車のカギやッ!スーパーまでの運転後、カギを戻すのを忘れてしまいました。ハッと息を飲んで時計を見たら、師匠のお宅に伺うにはもう遅かったです。

ということで、今朝カギを戻しに、そしておずおずと謝りに、もう一度師匠のお宅に行ってまいりました。師匠は微笑みながら「おっ、分った。よろしい。」とおっしゃてくださいました。鈍いミスをしてしまいましたが、もう一度師匠にお会いでき、もう一度お礼を申し上げられましたので、嬉しかったです。

Earthenware Pot and the Mouse 土鍋鼠

Last night was a night full of dreams.

Or at least I could remember many of them upon waking up.

It’s been a while since I’ve remembered my dreams so clearly.

I’ve heard  that one is becoming truly fluent in a second language when s/he starts dreaming in that language.

Well, what does it mean when you begin dreaming about hanashika, and your dreams are like rakugo stories?

Last night I had the following dream.

I was at Katsura Yonedanji V’s (Katsura Beichô III’s pupil, and own son) house for breakfast. I don’t remember what was being prepared, but the house was very Western. In fact, I think we were in my parents’ next-door neighbors’ house.

I was calling Yonedanji “Yonedanji-san,” and then it dawned on me that, since he has rakugo pupils of his own, I should probably be calling him Yonedanji-shishô. Wow, even in my dreams I am concerned with obeying the rules of hierarchical society…

I apologized and inquired, “you have two pupils now, right?” “Five,” he corrected me. Indeed, the kitchen and dining room was bustling with good-looking young men, busy preparing breakfast and setting the table. (In reality he does have two.)

Then Yonedanji and I had the following conversation:

YONEDANJI: I have a really nice, old earthenware nabe [for hotpot] that belonged to my mother. She doesn’t need it anymore and I’ve been trying to find a good friend to give it to. Could you use it?

I have my own (cheap) nabe, so I really do not need another, but I thought, since this nabe technically belonged to the Living National Treasure Katsura Beichô, I should probably not turn it down.

MATT: Really? Me? Are you sure? How could I…

With that, Yonedanji went outside to a picnic table to fetch the nabe. I could see him through a window, but I tried not to watch him for fear of being rude. He returned with a handsome though dusty, antique nabe.

YONEDANJI: Here it is. Take a look.

I took it in my hands and opened the lid. Inside, I was surprised to find a little mouse. I wasn’t sure if Yonedanji had seen it, so, to keep from startling him, and  his deshi, I commented casually.

MATT: Oh, there’s a little mouse inside.

With this Yonedanji, and all of his deshi, erupted in laughter. He explained how easy it is to catch mice in nabe by putting a little food inside and leaving the lid cracked open. Indeed, Yondedanji was quite pleased with himself.

The joke was on me, and I can’t remember if I even got to keep Beicho’s nabe!

Maybe I will find out as I dream tonight.

夕べ、夢を沢山見ました。

ま、起きたらいくつか記憶に残っていました。

夢をこんなにはっきり覚えているのは久しぶりです。

第二言語で夢を見ていたら、もうぺらぺらだとどこかで聞きましたな。

でも、噺家について夢を見て、その内容が落語の根多のような感じでしたら、どういう意味なんかな...

夕べ、こんな夢を見ました。

5代目桂米団治さん(3代目米朝師匠の弟子、実の息子)の家で朝ご飯を食べることになっていました。どんな料理を用意されていたかはよく覚えていませんが、彼の家は本当に洋風の家でした。確かに、私たちはうちの親のお隣さんの家の中にいました。

最初は「米団治さん、米団治さん」と言い、お弟子さんがいるので、やはり「米団治師匠」と呼んだ方がいいでしょうと思いつきました。凄いなあ、夢の中でも縦社会を気にしている...

彼に謝り、「米団治師匠って、お弟子さんは2人いますよね。」と言い、「5人」と直されました。ひょっとしたら、朝ご飯の準備で忙しかったイケメンがいっぱいだったからかもしれません。キッチンもダイニングルームも賑やかでした。(現実には弟子が2人います。)

米団治さんと次の会話がありました。

米団治:「うちのお母さんが使っていた古い、ええ土鍋あるんやけど、もう要らんと言うさかい、ええ友達にあげようと思っていたんや。マットは要らん?」

実は、僕は(安い)土鍋があるから、もう一つは要りませんねぇと思いました。けど...厳密には、その土鍋は人間国宝の桂米朝師匠がお使いになった土鍋でしょう。断ったらいけないなと思いました。

マット:「えっ?僕?本当ですかっ?そんなぁ...」

すると、米団治さんが家の外にあるピクニックテーブルの上から土鍋を取りに行きました。窓から彼の姿が見えていたんですが、あまりじっと見たら失礼でしょうと思い、目をそらしました。帰ってくると、手に持っていたのはちょっと埃のついた粋なアンティークの土鍋でした。

米団治:「これ、見てみ。」

土鍋を手に取り、ふたを開けると、小さな鼠が中に入っていましたので、びっくりしました。米団治さんが気づいているかどうか分からなかったので、びっくりさせないように、さりげなく

マット:「おぉ、小ちゃい鼠入ってますねぇ。」

と言うと、米団治さん、そして皆が大爆笑しました。その後、米団治さんが、土鍋にちょっとした餌を入れて、蓋をちょっと開けとくだけで鼠をすぐ捕まえられるでととても自慢しながら説明しました。

メッチャいたずらされました。米朝師匠の土鍋をいただいて帰れたかまでは記憶にありませんが...

今晩また夢を見て、それが分かるかもしれません。

For Water Boiling 水だき用

The Japanese language is hard. I am reminded of this fact every day. No matter how much I learn, there is always more learn. Speaking, reading comprehension, composition…

I enjoy the challenge of Japanese though, I really do.

This week, on Wednesday, I spent the day at Somemaru’s house. After a day of shamisen lessons, he said he wanted to make nabe (hot pot). He wrote out a list of ingredients and sent me shopping. I could read everything on the list, so no questions asked. I was on my way.

I got to the supermarket and started putting ingredients into my basket one by one, beginning with the vegetables: 1/2 head of hakusai (Chinese cabbage); one bunch of kikuna (garland chrysanthemum — Japanese greens); one tub of shiitake mushrooms; 1/2 daikon radish, the lower half; one bunch of shironegi (leeks).

Next, one tub of kinugoshi (silk-strained) tofu, sliced; one pack of kuzukiri (arrowroot noodles).

Next, raw oysters, two packs.

And finally, 400 grams of thinly sliced pork loin, mizudaki yô

Mizudaki yô? Huh? “For mizudaki?” … “For water daki?” … daki… “burn?” … “boil?” “For water boiling…?” Ugh.

I asked a young part-timer, stocking meat nearby.

MATT: Excuse me. Is this pork loin here mizudaki yô?

PART-TIMER: Mizudaki yô?

MATT: Yes. Mizudaki yô. See, it’s written right here.

PART-TIMER: I’ll be right back, sir.

Off the young man goes, soon to return with an older employee. I pick up the pork loin Somemaru always buys for nabe.

EMPLOYEE: Hi, you’re having nabe right?

MATT: Yes, that’s right.

EMPLOYEE: What you have there is fine.

MATT: This is mizudaki yô?

EMPLOYEE: Yes.

MATT: Thank you.

I paid for the groceries and hurried back to Somemaru’s. On my way I smiled and thought to myself, if Japanese language is difficult for even Japanese people, I have a LONG way to go.

I promise to always remember my learning experiences, and show compassion to my Japanese language students in the future…

The first entry for “mizudaki” in the Kôjien dictionary (electronic version): Nabe ryôri no isshu (one type of nabe cuisine).

日本語は難しいです。毎日この事実に気づきます。いくら学んでも、学び足りません。話すこと、読解作文...

しかし、日本語にあるチャレンジが好きです。本当に。

今週の水曜日に師匠のお宅に伺わせていただきました。一日の三味線のお稽古が終わると、鍋にしょうかと師匠がおっしゃいました。お買い物のリストを書き、僕にお渡ししました。お書きになった材料を全て読めたので、そのまま質問せずにスーパーに向かいました。

スーパーに着きますと、材料を一つずつ籠に入れ始めました。まずはお野菜:白菜 半切、菊菜 1、しいたけ 1、大根 下半分、白ねぎ 1。

続きまして、絹ごし(切れたやつ) 1、くずきり 1。

次は、かき 2袋。

そして、最後に豚ロース 水だき用 400g

え?水だき用?用=for … For 水だき? 水=water … For water だき?… 焚き?炊き?For water boiling? わっ。

すぐ近くにお肉を仕入れている若いアルバイトに聞いてみることにしました。

マット:「すみません。この豚ロースは水だき用ですか。」

アルバイト:「水だき用?」

マット:「はい、水だき用。ここに書いていますが。」

アルバイト:「少々お待ちください。」

すると、アルバイトが消えますが、間もなく年上の店員さんを連れてきます。僕、師匠がいつも鍋にお買いになる豚ロースを手に取ります。

店員さん:「鍋でっか。」

マット:「はい、そうなんです。」

店員さん:「それでいいですよ。」

マット:「これは水だき用ですか。」

店員さん:「はい、そうですよ。」

マット:「えらいすいません。」

レジでお支払いをして、師匠のお宅へ急いで戻りました。その途中で、微笑みながら、「日本人にも日本語が難しかったら、僕はこれからやなあ」と思いました。

それぞれの学習体験を身につけて、将来の日本語の学生に同情することを約束します。

広辞苑(電子版)の中、「水炊き」の第一定義:鍋料理の一種。

How To Say Nagoya 名古屋の言い方

Yesterday, I had the following conversation with my friend from Tokyo (a University of Tokyo teacher):

MATT: The Chûnichi Dragons are from Nagoya, right?

FRIEND: Yeah. But it’s Nagoya.

MATT: Yeah. Nagoya.

FRIEND: No, the accent is Nagoya.

MATT: But, I live in Osaka, so…

FRIEND: Yeah, but, I think people from Osaka also pronounce it Nagoya.

MATT: Really? But, I recently took a trip to Nagoya with Somemaru, and I was saying Nagoya this and Nagoya that, and he didn’t say a thing. As a matter of fact, I’m pretty sure he was saying Nagoya too.

FRIEND: Maybe Somemaru is just a nice guy and wasn’t correcting you. But, I’m not from Osaka, so I don’t really know. But, I think it’s Nagoya.

MATT: Strange.

FRIEND: Huh? Me?

MATT: No, it’s just that, I’ve come all this way thinking it’s Nagoya, and saying Nagoya…

FRIEND: But, yeah…

MATT: This is really getting to me. I’m going to ask Somemaru tomorrow.

FRIEND: Come on, I don’t think you have to take it that far…

And, fast-forward to today; I asked Somemaru how to say Nagoya. No, actually, I wrote “Nagoya” on a piece of paper and asked him to read it. Sure enough, it was NAgoya. Somemaru had one thing to say: “You might want to apologize to your friend.”

(Deep bow, forehead to the ground) I’M SO SORRY!

Here’s what I learned today: 1) Nagoya is pronounced Nagoya; 2) Don’t debate matters with University of Tokyo teachers; 3) It’s NOT okay to assume my “foreign accent” is Osaka dialect.

昨日、東京の友達(東大の先生)とこんな会話がありました:

マット:「中日ドラゴンズって、名古屋やったけ?」

友:「そうだよ。でも、古屋だよ。」

マット:「そうや。名屋。」

友:「いえいえ、アクセントは古屋です。」

マット:「でも、ぼく、大阪にすんでいるからな。」

友:「いや、でも、大阪の人も古屋と言うと思いますよ。」

マット:「ホンマ?でも、こんな間、師匠と一緒に名屋に行ったらな、名屋ああ、名屋こう言ってな、師匠はな〜にも言ってなかったで。確かに師匠も名屋と言ってたで。」

友:「師匠が優しいから、何も言っていなかっただけかもよ。まあ、私は大阪の人じゃないですからね。でも、多分、古屋だよ。」

マット:「おかしいなあ。」

友:「え?私?」

マット:「いえいえ、なんか、ずっと名屋と思ってきて。ずっと名屋と言ってきたからな...」

友:「でも、多分...」

マット:「気になるなあ。明日、師匠に聞いとこう。」

友:「いえいえ、そこまでは別に...」

そして今日、師匠に聞いてみました。聞いたというより、「名古屋」を紙に書いて、読んでいただきました。やっぱり古屋でした。師匠の一言:「友達に謝りなさい。」

(土下座)本当にすみませんでした。

今日習ったことその①名古屋は古屋ということ。その②東大の先生と議論しないこと。その③外人なまりを勝手に大阪弁やと思い込んだらアキマヘンこと。