Off to Tokyo Next Month 来月は東京へ

Next month I am “going home,” to Japan.

This time I will be living in Tokyo, not Osaka. Some friends are asking me, why do you need to go to Tokyo when you’re studying Kamigata rakugo. They may be partly right, but I’ve never lived in Tokyo before, and also feel that I should get to know Tokyo rakugo a little better in order to understand the “true essence” of Kamigata rakugo.

Of course I’m planning to visit Osaka while living in Tokyo. After all, that’s where Somemaru is, and I will also need to do some more work at Osaka yose and museums.

But, it’s not like I can’t hear Kamigata rakugo in Tokyo. There are a number of Kamigata artists who perform there quite regularly. It will be interesting to see how they perform in Tokyo, whether they perform differently there than they do in Osaka.

I heard there are almost no convenience stores in the neighborhood I am going to be living in, but I also heard it’s a great area.

To the University of Tokyo: 1-minute walk

To the Suzumoto Engeijô (yose): .74mi (1.2km)

To the Shitamachi Museum: .74mi

To the Oedo Ueno Hirokojitei (yose): .86mi (1.4km)

To Kanda-Jinbochô (used bookstores, Rakugo Cafe, etc.): 1.7mi (2.8km)

To the Asakusa Engei Hall (yose): 2.1mi (3.5km)

To the Oedo Nihonbashitei (yose): 2.3mi (3.7km)

To the Asakusa Mokubatei (yose): 2.3mi

To the Edo Tokyo Museum: 2.8mi (4.5km)

To the Tsubouchi Shôyô Memorial Theater Museum (Waseda University): 3mi (4.9km)

To the National Engeijô (yose): 3.3mi (5.3km)

To the Ikebukuro Engeijô (yose): 3.8mi (6.1km)

To the Edo Fukagawa Museum: 3.8mi

To the Shinjuku Suehirotei (yose): 4.3mi (7km)

To the Tenman Tenjin Hanjôtei (yose in Osaka): 307.5mi (495km)

With the exception of the Hanjôtei, all of these places are of bike-able distance from my place. I can’t wait!

I’m sure there are plenty of other worthwhile yose, museums, libraries, etc., but I still know next to nothing about Tokyo.

I would love to hear from anybody that has an interesting place to recommend. Please leave a comment below!

来月、日本にカエリマス。

今回は大阪じゃなく、東京の方に住む予定です。上方落語を勉強しているのに、なんで東京に行く必要あるねンという友達もいます。それはそうですが、東京に住んだことはないし、上方落語の本質をはっきり理解するには、少しでも東京落語を勉強した方がいいと思いました。

もちろん、東京にいる間に大阪に帰ろうと思ってます。師匠もいらっしゃるし、大阪の寄席や資料館でももうちょっと勉強しないと。

まあ、東京で上方落語を聴けないことはありません。ある上方の噺家は東京でもよく出ています。東京でどのように演出している、大阪での演出より変わるかどうかは、それもまた面白い研究のテーマになると思います。

住む場所ですが、コンビニはないらしいですが、とてもいいとこだそうです。

東大まで、歩いて1分。

鈴本演芸場まで、1.2キロ

下町風俗資料館まで、1.2キロ

お江戸上野広小路亭まで、1.4キロ

神田神保町(古本街やらくごカフェ)まで、2.8キロ

浅草演芸ホールまで、3.5キロ

お江戸日本橋亭まで、3.7キロ

浅草木馬亭まで、3.7キロ

江戸東京博物館まで、4.5キロ

早稲田大学・坪内逍遥博士記念演劇博物館まで、4.9キロ

国立演芸場まで、5.3キロ

池袋演芸場まで、6.1キロ

江戸深川資料館まで、6.1キロ

新宿末広亭まで、7キロ

天満天神繁昌亭まで、495キロ

繁昌亭以外、自転車で行ける距離ですね。たのしみ〜。

他の面白い寄席、資料館、美術館、図書館など、いろいろあると思いますが、僕はまだ東京あまり知りません。

皆様、ぜひ、面白いところ教えてくださいませ。コメントでお願いいたしま〜す。↓

Beautiful Nudity 美しいヌード

I spend most of my time these days speaking Japanese, reading Japanese books, enjoying Japanese theatre, and exploring the main thoroughfares and back streets of the cities and backwaters of… Japan. I love living in Japan and am extremely fortunate to be having the experiences I am. Today I did something quite different for a change.

Somemaru invited me on a trip out to the Kobe City Museum (Kobe shiritsu hakubutsukan), which until June 12 is hosting “The Body Beautiful in Ancient Greece from the British Museum.” I was happy to attend this exhibition because, while I am a fan of its theatre and arts, I rarely have the chance to study ancient Greece. Among other things, we viewed numerous beautiful vases and sculptures. I was attracted to the marble sculptures most of all. I grew up seeing many of these works depicted in cartoons and picture books, and later in junior high and high school art and history books. Seeing Greece’s ancient art in person, needless to say, is a completely different experience.

If I had to choose just one sculpture as my favorite today it would be part of the marble sculpture “Two Boys Fighting Over a Game of Knucklebones” for its realism, movement, and humor. I also enjoyed many others, including the famous main attraction, “The Discobolus,” and other art depicting athletes, particularly runners.

I wasn’t aware of the fact that ancient Greek athletes competed in the nude. Asthetics — beauty of the well-toned male body — obviously won over practicality in Greek sports. There are records of early modern Japanese runners — hikyaku couriers — running nude, but in most cases they at least wore waraji (straw sandals) to protect their feet and fundoshi (loincloths) to support and cover the second-most important things they carried. While hikyaku depicted in ukiyo-e and actual photos are shown to have toned legs and bodies, I can’t remember ever coming across a Japanese text that in any way celebrates them for their beauty as the Greeks did their professional athletes. Hikyaku were not professional athletes, though. They were rough, low-class servicemen.

Image property of Honolulu Academy of Arts.

Sumô wrestlers, on the other hand, have long been professional athletes respected and admired for their toned bodies, often featured nude aside from mawashi (sumo belts, like glorified fundoshi). To the untrained Western eye sumô wrestlers appear obese and out of shape, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. They are incredibly fast, agile, and flexible, and most of their weight is made up of brawny muscle. Though ancient Greece’s naked athletes and Japan’s sumô wrestlers are worlds and more than a millenium apart, their physical feats and beautiful nudity were appreciated in similar fashion.

Since this is a blog about Kamiagata Rakugo, I might do well to end here by mentioning there are a number of rakugo stories about sumô, including Hanaikada ([A Stand-in for the Champ] Hanaikada), Kôsuke mochi (Kôsuke’s Mochi Shop [Flourishes Thanks to a Sumo Wrestler]), Kuwagata (Kuwagata [the Small Champ]), and Ôyasu’uri (Cheap Sell [the Sumo Wrestler with an Awkward-but-befitting Name]).

Somemaru shishô, thank you for the opportunity to do some cross-cultural comparison and contrast! A very nice day in Kobe indeed.

最近、ほぼ毎日日本語で話したり、日本語の本を読んだり、日本の演劇を鑑賞したりしています。日本の町々の大通りや裏道を冒険するのも好きです。日本での生活が大好きで、この国で様々な経験ができ、僕は本当にラッキーだと思っていす。そんな中、今日は普段とはかなり違う経験ができました。

染丸師匠が神戸市立博物館で6月12日まで行っている「大英博物館古代ギリシャ展:完璧の肉体・完全なる美」に誘ってくださいました。今日の展示を見れたことは本当によかったです。前から古代ギリシャの演劇や美術が好きでしたが、最近は古代ギリシャのことを勉強する機会は減っていました。沢山の美しい壷や像が多くありましたが、僕にとって、像が一番よかったです。子供の頃からこの像をアニメや絵本などで目にしていて、中学校と高校の歴史と美術の教科書でもたまに見ていましたが、古代ギリシャの美術を実際に見るというのは、全く違う経験でした(当たり前ですね)。

その中でも一つだけ選べと言われたら、「ナックルボーンの勝負を巡って争う二人の少年の像」が一番よかったです。この像にはリアリティがあり、また動作もユーモアもはっきりしていて、本当によかったです。他にも沢山ありました。例えば、この展覧会のメインとなる、有名な「円盤投げ」やアスリート(特にマラソン選手)の描写などがとても魅力的でした。

古代ギリシャのアスリートが真裸で競争していたことを今まで知らなかったです。古代ギリシャのスポーツでは、美意識(男性の鍛えられている肉体の美しさ)が能力より大切だったみたいです。近世日本では飛脚も裸で走っていたことが記録されていますが、ほとんどの場合は、少なくとも、足を守るように草鞋を履いていて、二番目に大切な「荷物」をサポートする、そして冠るためにふんどしをしていました。浮世絵や写真で見ると飛脚の足や体もかなり鍛えられていましたが、ギリシャのプロアスリートがその肉体美を讃えられていたのとは異なり、(僕が知っている限り)飛脚の肉体を讃えられることはあまりありませんでした。しかし、飛脚はプロアスリートではなく、むしろ割と荒々しく、身分の低い使用人でありました。

飛脚と違って、相撲取りは昔からのプロアスリートであり、その肉体が特に尊敬され、憧れてきました。まわしを除いては、裸で競争する相撲取りは浮世絵などでよく描写されてきました。相撲に詳しくない西洋人がこれを見るとその体は「デブ、不健康」と思ってしまうかもしれませんが、大間違いですね。相撲取りは早くて、機敏で、体がとても柔らかいです。それに、体重のほとんどが立派な筋肉です。古代ギリシャのアスリートと相撲取りの世界とは、時代がずいぶん離れていますが、その偉業や肉体美(ヌード)は同じように賞賛されました。

このブログは一応、上方落語について書いているので、ここでは上方落語に相撲の噺もあるということを伝えた方がいいかもしれません。その中には「花筏」、「幸助餅」、「鍬潟」、「大安売り」があります。

師匠、比較研究の機会を作ってくださいまして、本当にどうもありがとうございました。神戸で素敵な一日を過ごすことができました。

Utagawa Kuniyoshi Exhibit 歌川国芳展

Cats forming the word "octopus" (tako). Image property of http://www.kuniyoshiproject.com

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1798-1861) is said to be one of the last great early modern ukiyo-e (woodblock print and painting) artists. Kuniyoshi is known for incorporating a number of styles and treating an array of subjects, but, being the cat lover I am, I have for some time especially enjoyed his depiction of cats, which were sometimes used to represent real people, such as popular kabuki actors, courtesans, and government officials.

The Osaka City Museum of Fine Arts (Osaka shiritsu hakubutsukan) is currently putting on a major Kuniyoshi exhibition in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of his death. I have seen posters advertising this exhibition in train stations and have been meaning to go, so I was happy when Somemaru said earlier this week he would like to take me. We went  to the exhibition today, spending two and a half hours touring the staggeringly vast show.

It was simply fabulous. To say the least, it was a treat to see so many quality Kuniyoshi ukiyo-e in one place, up close and personal — the old handmade paper, the wonderful bold colors, an incredible display of popular early modern subjects, different editions of the same prints, meticulously carved cherry wood blocks (done by artisans, not Kuniyoshi)… the list goes on.

I know that Somemaru is a big art lover, and is himself an artist, but what does he as a hanashika get out of viewing wonderful art such as this? According to him, there is much “play” (asobi, e.g., share, mitate) in Kuniyoshi’s work. This gives hanashika an idea about the kind of games people played in early modern Japan, what they thought was funny and fashionable, what inspired trends.

"Hyaku monogatari," inspired by Hayashiya Shôzô I. Image property of http://www.kuniyoshiproject.com

There is not much to do about ukiyo-e in rakugo, but, being that countless works in this style serve as realistic illustrations of Edo-period life, they offer much to hanashika (and rakugo fans) as aids to imagination and understanding. Interestingly, it became clear today that rakugo (or one of its early modern predecessors) inspired Kuniyoshi in at least one case. The 1840 print “One Hundred Tales: Picture of the Haunted Mansion” (Hyaku monogatari bakemono yashiki no zu) was inspired by a ghost story (kaidan banashi) composed and performed by the hanashika Hayashiya Shôzô I (1781-1842), one of Somemaru’s artistic ancestors.

We had a great time today viewing Kuniyoshi’s art. I was very lucky to tour the exhibit with Somemaru, who was kind to give me a mini-lecture at virtually every print.

After we finished at the Osaka City Museum of Fine Arts we went out for Chinese food. Shishô, thank you for a very educational, and enjoyable day!

歌川国芳(1798年~1861年)は近世後期の浮世絵界で最後の名人の一人と呼ばれています。様々なスタイルとテーマを用いましたが、僕は猫好きですからか、前から国芳の猫の描写が特に好きでした。国芳の猫はたまに本当の人物、歌舞伎の役者、遊女、政府の役員などを象徴します。

只今、大阪市立博物館が国芳没後150周年の大きな展覧会を行っています。駅などで国芳展のポスターをよく見かけていまして、いつか見に行きたいなと思っていました。そんな矢先今週の始め頃、染丸師匠が国芳展に誘ってくださいましたので、とても嬉しかったです。今日、師匠と一緒に行って、2時間半も立派な展示をゆっくり見てきました。

一言で言うと、最高でした。控えめに言っても、一カ所でこんなにたくさんの国芳の絵を直で鑑賞できるなんて、贅沢でした。古い手作りの紙、鮮やかに目立つ色、幅広い近世の主題、同じ浮世絵の異版との細かい違い、非常に注意深く掘られている桜の木版、等など。

染丸師匠は絵が大好きで、絵もよくお描きになります。師匠が今日のような素敵な絵をご覧になり、噺家としてどんなメリットがあるのか教えてくださいました。国芳の絵には「遊び」(しゃれ、見立てなど)がたっぷり入っています。国芳の浮世絵は噺家に江戸時代の人々の遊び方、粋、流行の原点などについて教えてくれます。

落語では浮世絵の話はあまり出ませんが、多くの浮世絵が近世の現実をそのまま保存しているので、噺家にとって(落語のファンにも)近世を想像し理解する上で、大事な資料です。面白いことに、歌川国芳は落語(正しく、その前の話芸)に少なくとも一度影響されました。1840年の版画ですが、「百物語化け物屋敷図」というものは、染丸師匠の祖先である初代林屋正蔵(1781年~1842年)が創作して語っていた怪談噺を想像して描かれたものです。

今日は、国芳の絵を鑑賞でき、本当に楽しかったです。版画一枚一枚ごとに染丸師匠がミニレクチャーまでしてくださいました。僕はホンマにラッキーでしょう。

大阪市立博物館の後は、中華料理を食べに行きました。師匠、とても勉強になり、また楽しい一日を、本当にどうもありがとうございました。

The Rakugo Museum in Ikeda 池田の落語みゅーじあむ

Today I visited the Rakugo Museum in Ikeda. There I found a number of interesting exhibits and a space to perform rakugo (shows are put on here twice a month, usually costing ¥1000 to ¥1500 for tickets), but best of all there is a superb collection of books, CDs, DVDs, etc., in a second-floor resource center. Included in the collection of rakugo books are some rare one’s I cannot afford. Next to Somemaru’s own collection of rakugo books (not open to the public, of course), this may be the best collection I’ve found yet. Best of all, the Rakugo Museum is open and free to the public.

Ikeda is on the Hankyu Takarazuka line, a bit out of the way from the center of Osaka, but the 45-minute trip is worth it. I was thoroughly impressed with this clean and inviting town. There are a number of other museums, temples and shrines, a castle, and outdoor mini-galleries on street corners, all accessible on enjoyable walking courses, which generally only take a couple hours each. Most important for me and other rakugo fans are the two Kamigata Rakugo stories set in Ikeda: Ikeda no ushi home (Complimenting a Cow in Ikeda) and Ikeda no shishi gai (Buying Ikeda Boar Meat). Truly, thanks to the banners throughout the area advertising the Rakugo Museum, and various rakugo events held here during the year, Ikeda City is quickly becoming a “rakugo town.”

今日は池田市にある落語みゅーじあむを訪ねてみました。そこに興味深い展示も高座もあります (月に二回ほど落語会が行われ、チケットは1000円〜1500円です)。しかし、一番よかったのが二階にある資料室でした。落語の本、CD、DVDなどがタクサンあります。僕の予算ではなかなか買えない珍しい本もあります。染丸師匠の資料コレクション (もちろん、一般の方は拝見できません) を除いて、今まで見つけた上方落語の資料室の中で、落語みゅーじあむが一番多かったてす。

阪急宝塚線にある池田は大阪市内よりちょっと遠いですが、やはり、45分の旅をする価値があります。印象として、池田は本当にきれいで温かい可愛らしい町でした。他の博物館もいくつかあって、寺社もお城もあり、まちかどキャラリーまでもあります。これらを巡る散歩コースもいくつかあり、どちらも2時間ほどしかかからないらしいです。僕みたいな落語ファンにとって、池田で最も興味をそそるのは、この町の名前が入っている上方噺が二つもあるということです。この噺は「池田の牛ほめ」と「池田の猪買い」と言います。池田中に落語みゅーじあむの旗も沢山見られ、町の年中行事に落語のイベントが何度も行われています。これを見ると、池田市はだんだん「落語の町」になってきているというのは確かなことですね。

Osaka Kamigata Performance Resource Center 大阪府立上方演芸資料館

Today I spent about four hours at the Osaka Prefecture Kamigata Performance Resource Center (Osaka-fu ritsu Kamigata engei shiryô kan), also known as Waha Kamigata. Here they have a great museum devoted to traditional yose arts such as rakugo, naniwabushi, manzai, kôdan, etc. My favorite part of the museum were clips of rakugo masters from the SP record era such as Katsura Harudanji I and Hayashiya Somemaru II, and a walk-through Kamigata Performance timeline, complete with a fine collection of artifacts from different periods on display (e.g., props, clothing, flyers, performers’ cherished personal belongings, etc.). There is also a great resource library with a nice selection of books to read, and CDs and DVDs to listen to and view, in house. I have been to a number of shows held at the performance spaces in the Waha Kamigata complex, which also houses the bookstore Junkudô, but this was the first time I visited the museum and library. I had a wonderful time, and will be going back very soon, and often since international students get in without dropping a yen. Not that the price of entry is expensive: ¥400 for general admission, ¥250 for domestic students, and FREE for those only wanting to use the resource library! Whether you spend money or not, the experience will definitely be worth it. Please do stop by if you’re in the neighborhood (Nanba).

今日は4時間ぐらい大阪府立上方演芸資料館(ワッハ上方)でゆっくり過ごしました。そこには寄席の芸である落語、浪花節、漫才、講談などの興味深い博物館があって、その中にSPレコードの時代の噺家(初代桂春団治や二代目林家染丸)の高座のクリップ、それから、それぞれの時代の道具・服・チラシ・芸人の愛用私物のある部屋が僕にとって博物館の一番面白いところでした。現場で読み聴ける本/CD/DVDなどが、たくさん揃えてある資料館もあります。ジュンク堂(本屋)もあるワッハ上方の建物の中の演芸場で、何度も落語会などを聴きに行っていますが、資料館に行くのは今日が初めてでした。本当に楽しかったし、近いうちにまた行きたいと思っています。留学生は入館料が無料なので、これからよく行くと思います。留学生じゃなくてもなかなか安いです。一般の方は400円、高大生は250円。資料館利用のみでしたら誰でも無料です!お金を出しても、出さなくても、とても価値のある経験に違いありません。もしお近く(難波)に来た際には、ぜひ寄ってみてください。