Hikohachi Matsuri 2011 第21回彦八まつり

After returning to the US in 2005, it took five long years to be able to return to Japan, and to once again enjoy the excitement of the Hikohachi Matsuri. Ironically, Hikohachi Matsuri 2011 was almost called off due to Typhoon #12 (Talas). In fact, for the first time in its 21-year history, the first day was cancelled.

Despite this, Somemaru had his group of hanashika and ohayashi performers practice Sumiyoshi odori the day before as planned. This is a popular set of dances they perform every year at the festival. I attended practice and went home with Somemaru and a few others to help with further preparations, in hopes that the second day would not be cancelled.

Fortunately, while rain was still in the forecast, day two of the Hikohachi Masturi was held as scheduled. I got up, put on my yukata, and headed for the Ikutama Shrine with umbrella in hand.

Last time I was in Japan, I left shortly following the death of Katsura Bunshi V, in 2005. I was quite grief stricken because he was the man I called Shishô for the previous three years. The Kamigata Rakugo world was in pain because it had lost one of its giants. But we had many reasons to celebrate his life. Bunshi, along with a number of others, had accomplished so much. In the course of his life, the Kamigata Rakugo Association had been formed, hanashika numbers had increased dramatically, the art experienced several major booms, the Hikohachi Matsuri was launched, and the list goes on. Shortly after Bunshi died, one of his remaining dreams was realized; Kamigata Rakugo received its first permanent home in the post World War II era, the Tenman Tenjin Hanjôtei. Thanks to this, Kamigata Rakugo experienced yet another boom, still continuing today.

Today Hikohachi Matsuri 2011 was held in the usual place, on the grounds of Ikutama Shrine, in Osaka. I went to help at Somemaru’s “rakugo family” (ichimon) booth, but I made sure to stop by Bunshi’s, where I found some of his pupils cooking the legendary dish that he fed them while in training over the years, which he himself also cooked at the Hikohachi Matsuri in years past: yaki udon (fried and seasoned udon noodles topped with a fried egg, soft yolk).

I have made and eaten yaki udon with Bunshi in the past, so it was wonderful to visit the Bunshi booth again today and enjoy that nostalgic flavor. It made me happy to see that his pupils also had a portrait of Bunshi hanging inside the booth. It was as if Bunshi was there with all of us in spirit.

From morning until night I helped the Somemaru ichimon at their booth, calling out to festival-goers and fans, inviting them to try their luck at winning big prizes by pulling tickets from a fish bowl. With the group I banged on drums and rang bells all day. “Come one, come all! One try, one hundred yen!” We had so much fun even though we were rained on throughout the day, on and off. The crowds were wonderful. They didn’t let the rain dampen the festival atmosphere one bit.

Of course it was great to see Somemaru take the stage with his group at 12:30.  Though it was raining just before hand, the sun breifly came out for their performance. This allowed an even larger crowd to gather around the stage.

Despite the stage being wet, and everybody’s white tabi getting soaked, all dances went well. A couple people couldn’t help slipping, but there were no major accidents. Somemaru’s pupil, Emimaru, was even able to do a backflip in his dance as planned.

Indeed, it was wonderful to be back at the Hikohachi Matsuri, a festival put on by hanashika to be able to spend time brushing shoulders with fans outside of the yose, to personally thank them for their patronage throughout the year.

After closing Somemaru’s booth, we changed out of our yukata and said goodbye for the evening. I stuck around a little longer to enjoy Katsura Ayame and Hayashiya Somejaku (a.k.a. comedy duo Anesama Kingusu), et al, perform to a “packed house” in their booth-turned-mini theater.

I could go on and on about what a fun and memorable day it was, but I will let some more pictures do the talking (at bottom). I hope to see you all at the Hikohachi Matsuri in the years to come!

2005年にアメリカに帰国して、去年再来日、彦八まつりに再び参加するまでに五年もかかってしまいました。ですから、今年の彦八まつりを大変楽しみにしていました。皮肉なことに、今年の彦八まつりは台風12号によって中止になりそうでしたが、結局初日のみキャンセルされました。これは21年間の彦八まつり史上、初めてのことでした。

初日は中止になりましたが、染丸師匠が噺家さんとお林さんを呼び、「住吉踊り」のお稽古を予定通り一日前に行いました。「住吉踊り」はとても人気があり、染丸師匠のメンバーが毎年彦八まつりで踊っています。お稽古を見学させていただいてから、師匠とお弟子さん数人と一緒に帰り、二日目が中止にならないように祈りながら、まつりの準備を一緒にさせていただきました。

天気予報は「雨」でしたが、幸いなことに彦八まつりの二日目は行われることになりました。今朝起き、浴衣を着て傘を手に生国魂神社に向かいました。

以前日本にいた時は、五代目桂文枝が亡くなってから、三ヶ月も経たないうちにアメリカに帰国しなくてはいけませんでした。文枝師匠が亡くなったと聞いた時、本当に寂しくて今でもその時のことが忘れられません。その日まで三年間、「師匠」と読ばせていただいていた、とても大きな存在でした。もちろん、上方落語界が受けた衝撃も大きかったに違いありません。上方落語界四天王のお一人がお亡くなりになりましたから。しかし、文枝師匠が達成なさった偉業は今でも受け継がれています。文枝師匠がいらっしゃった時に上方落語協会も設置され、噺家の人数もたくさん増えました。その間最大の落語ブームもいくつかあり、彦八まつりも始まりました。そして、何より文枝師匠が亡くなった次の年に、文枝師匠の夢の一つがかないました。上方落語の「定住ホーム」と言える場所が戦後初めてできたのです。天満天神繁昌亭ができ、現在も上方落語ブームが続いています。

例年同様、彦八まつりは今年も生国魂神社(大阪)で行われました。染丸師匠のブースで手伝わせていただきましたが、もちろん、文枝師匠一門のブースにも寄らせていただきました。そこでは、文枝師匠のお弟子さん数人が「桂文枝名物焼うどん」(柔らかい黄身の焼き卵がのっている焼うどん)を作っていらっしゃいました。一説によると文枝師匠が修行中のお弟子さんによ~く食べさせていたそうです。前に文枝師匠も彦八まつりでお作りになりました。
その焼うどんは、以前文枝師匠と一緒に作ったり、食べたこともありましたので、今日もその時の思い出とともにいただきました。文枝師匠一門のブースに伺い、焼うどんを頼んで、ホンマに良かったです。懐かしかったし、表現しきれない美味しさでした。さらにもう一つとても良かったことがありました。そのブースでは文枝師匠の写真がかけてあったのです。文枝師匠の笑顔をその場で見て、とても元気になりました。文枝師匠がそこに一緒にいらっしゃるように感じました。

今日は一日染丸師匠一門のブースで手伝いをさせていただきました。「はい、どうぞ~!いらっしゃいませ!一回百円です!」というかけ声や、太鼓、金を鳴らしながら「染丸の辻八卦」にお客様を呼びました。あいにくの雨でしたが、本当に楽しかったです。お客さんも彦八まつりを楽しみになさっていたようで、雨にも負けず、まつりのとてもいい雰囲気を作ってくださいました。

12:30に染丸師匠の「住吉踊り」の舞台を見に行きましたが、とても感動的でした。その直前強い雨が続いていましたが、舞台に上がると、何と晴れてきました。(師匠ははれ男?)晴れて本当に良かったです。雨が暫く止み、より多くのお客さんがステージの周りに集まってきてくれました。

舞台はとても濡れていて、皆さんの白い足袋もびしょびしょドロドロ状態になってしまいました。2、3人の方はちょっとすべっていましたが、怪我は無かったです。師匠のお弟子さん、笑丸さんが予定通り、バックフリップまでも完成させました。これもとてもかっこ良かったです。

落語ファン感謝デーでもある彦八まつりに再び参加させていただき、本当に良かったです。日が暮れてから、染丸師匠一門のブースを閉店し、浴衣から洋服に着替え、皆さんとお別れしました。しかし、僕の気持ちはまだとてもハイで直ぐには帰れませんでした。桂あやめさんと林家染雀さん(姉様キングス)と月亭遊方さんの「じょーだんハワイアンセンター」に寄り、とても面白いミニ劇場を見せていただきました。

今日はどれほど楽しかったか、この場で永遠に書けると思いますが、これぐらいにしときましょう。下の写真もどうぞご覧くださいませ。

  

  

Advertisements

Learn on Your Own 自分で習え

Somemaru had to teach Sumiyoshi odori (dance) at the Hanjôtei today, so after breakfast we changed clothes and headed out. It is always fun for me to wear yukata (thin, cotton kimono, usually worn during summer months, or for practice, work, or something else that might make you sweat), but today was my first time to drive wearing one. I got several strange looks from other drivers, and even a couple policemen. Somemaru got a kick out of this.

After dance practice Somemaru had a meeting with the manager of the Hanjôtei. Somemaru proposed ending music and dance classes (narimono kyôshitsu) for a number of reasons, the most significant being that only a few out of 15 or 20 zenza seem to actually be learning anything. Somemaru pointed out the fact that some masters, despite Kamigata rakugo being such a musical art, don’t really feel it’s important to learn anything besides storytelling. In this, some hanashika do nothing but shinsaku (lit. newly-composed) rakugo, which most often leaves traditional instruments out altogether.

Somemaru today expressed that he feels a brief indroduction to the basics of yose bayashi and dance is important, but following that formal introductions to outside teachers can be made to young hanashika who are truly intent on learning arts that will enable them to make their rakugo more “colorful” (hade). The result of today’s meeting was a decision to discontinue the narimono kyôshitsu as of March 31. If in the future there are serious requests for another class with regular meeting times, there is a chance that things will recommence, though, perhaps, with new guidelines for participants.

All this said, Somemaru truly feels that it is important for hanashika to learn outside (non-rakugo) traditional arts like Japanese dance, yose bayashi, etc. This, he says, will help them make their art more enjoyable to listen to and watch. Personally, Somemaru is a big fan of kabuki. He seems to have entire plays memorized. In fact, he even subscribes to the Kabuki Channel. Hardly a day goes by that we don’t watch kabuki at his house! Not surprisingly, Somemaru has many shibaibanashi (kabuki-inspired rakugo stories, which have a long history in Osaka) in his repetoire. Again, Somemaru feels practicing various arts is very important. Experiencing various things is important.

Speaking of having experiences, when I was a minarai apprentice of Katsura Bunshi V (1930-2005) he said half-jokingly that hanashika also need to spend time drinking, gambling, and carousing. Apparently hanashika need to know about these “three paths of pleasure” (sandôraku) since they are often found in rakugo stories.

今日、師匠が繁昌亭で住吉踊りを教える日だったので、朝食後に着替えて出かけました。浴衣を着るのがいつにしても楽しいけど、今日は初めて浴衣を着たままで運転しました。通っていたトライバー、そうしておまわりさんまでも僕の方へ見ていて「えっ?」みたいな顔をしていました。師匠がこれに笑っていました。

踊りのお稽古の後に、師匠が繁昌亭のマネジャーと会議がありました。鳴物教室を暫く止めましょうという話になりました。その理由の一つは、長いことをお稽古しても、前座15〜20人の中から数人しか上達しないからです。確かに一門一門のやり方があって、教室がなくても構わない方もおられるでしょう。噺以外必要なもの(芸)はないと思っているかたもおられるし、ハメモノがあまり入らない新作落語ばかりやっている方もいます。

定期的な教室を行うより、たまに興味を持つ前座に寄席囃子や鳴物などの簡単な入門ワークショップをやった方がいいかもしれません。その後、自分の落語を派手に(面白く・深く)するために他の芸を本気で習いたい前座がいたら、染丸師匠などがちゃんとした師範を紹介することも考えてくださるかもしれません。結局、今日の会議の結果は3月いっぱいで鳴物教室が暫く中止になることです。将来的に、教室をお願いする人がたくさんいたら、鳴物教室がまたできるでしょう。

落語でない芸、鳴物、踊り、その他、を勉強することはとても大事だと染丸師匠が心より思っています。例えば、師匠の場合、歌舞伎の大ファンで、歌舞伎の台詞・曲・舞などをたくさん覚えています。歌舞伎チャネルまでも予約しています。さすが!師匠の家で歌舞伎を見ない日はなかなかありません。当たり前のことかもしれないけど、師匠の落語レペトリーに芝居噺(歌舞伎から取った、または歌舞伎の影響がある噺)がたくさん入っています。ですから、鳴物教室が一時期なくなっても、師匠がそれぞれのお稽古は大事だと思っています。それぞれの経験は大事です。

経験の話を申しますと、五代目桂文枝の見習いをしていた時、ある日に文枝師匠が冗談半分でこういうこと言ってくださいました:三道楽(女、酒、賭け事)は落語によく出るから、噺家に三道楽も必要。

Pines, Rakugo, Togetherness 松、落語、連帯

Today was a very busy day, with five engagements on Somemaru’s schedule. In the morning we drove to the Rihga Royal Hotel in Nakanoshima (central Osaka) to perform at a banquet of about 500. Somemaru spoke a bit then performed with two pupils an auspicious dance for New Years, Matsu zukushi (Pines Plentiful). Next we sped off to the Hanjôtei for a afternoon show, of which Somemaru was the tori headliner (as usual).

After the afternoon slot, we went to a nearby cafe to have coffee/tea and cake with Rinseikai, Somemaru’s group of devoted fans. One man I spoke to has been following Somemaru for more almost 40 years! Now that is devotion (Interestingly, this man told me he made his way to the famous Ebisu Shrine in Nishinomiya that morning–as a reward, he felt, he won the wonderful framed shikishi that I mentioned in yesterday’s blog). After the break with Rinseikai, we returned to the Hanjôtei for a Hayashiya ichimon-kai, a show put on by all members of an artistic family. Because there is no way so many (14) people can be fit into one show, the Hayashiya family does a couple of these shows per year. Of course we had to have an after-show party, and that took place at a nearby restaurant. One of the highlights was a gift (new obi) presentation to Hanamaru, for winning the recent “Roaring Laughter Prize.” This party was a nice way to end a long day.

今日は本当に忙しい一日で、スケジュールに予定5つも入っていました。午前中は中之島にあるリーガロイヤルホテルまで運転して、参加者500人くらいの宴会でパフォーマンスがありました。師匠が面白い話の後、お弟子さん2人と新年のめでたい踊り「松づくし」をなさいました。その後すぐ、昼席の出番のために繁昌亭まで飛びました。

昼席が終わったら、近くのカフェに行って、師匠の献身的のファンクラブ「林染会」(りんせいかい)と一緒にティー&ケーキをいただきました。ある男性の方は40年以上師匠のことを応援しているらしいです。これはまったくの献身ですね。(面白いことに、午前中にこの方が西宮の恵美須神社で初詣でをしてきまして、そのご褒美にか、昨日のブログに書いていたフレームに入っている師匠の素敵な色紙絵を勝ち取りました。)林染会と少しゆっくりしたら、林家一門会を行うために繁昌亭に戻りました。一門の皆様(14人)は一回に出られないので、林家一門は年に2回くらい一門会を開きます。一門会の後、勿論、打ち上げもありました。近くのレストランで行われました。そのクライマックスは「爆笑賞」をいただいた花丸さんが帯のプレゼントを一門の皆様からいただいた時でした。この宴会はとても長い一日のおいしい終わり方でした。

First Rakugo 2011 初落語

Today Somemaru had two shows, at different venues. The first show was at the Hanjôtei. I am thrilled that Kamigata Rakugo finally has its own yose again (est. 2006, the first in the post-WWII era). Somemaru finished today’s Hanjôtei appearance with an auspicious dance to celebrate the New Year.

On the way to the next show we stopped by the temple Isshinji, near in Tennoji, to pay a visit to the grave of Hayashiya Somemaru II (1867-1952), which essentially serves as a symbol for this great artistic name, and its history, which dates back to the first Somemaru (c. 1831-1877). The second show of the day was at the Isshinji theater, where the current Somemaru performs annually.

At both venues I received otoshi-dama from elder storytellers. When I get  money gifts in this fashion it is my obligation to go directly to Somemaru, show him the envelope(s) that holds the money, announce who it is from, and tell Somemaru “thank you.” After all, if I weren’t associated with Somemaru, I wouldn’t receive such gifts. It was a busy day, but it was nice to get back into the swing of things with rakugo after the holiday hiatus.

Finally, I have to share one more picture. We ran into this sign that reads “Aizen san,” for a nearby temple and pond. A second possible reading for the Chinese characters is “Aisome san,” the name of this pupil, who is currently undergoing training with Somemaru.

翻訳を大変お待たせしております。