Whirlwind Week 駆け足の一週間

This was an eventful week. I spent just about every day at Somemaru’s, and here are some of the highlights:

Tuesday

This was a practice day, and I helped with the regular routine: breakfast, housecleaning, greeting students, serving tea, and staying within earshot of Somemaru in case he needed something. Somemaru usually decides what he wants for dinner during the last couple lessons, sending Aisome or I out for groceries. Today he felt like kasujiru (sake lees soup), which I haven’t had since last winter, and absolutely love. I have a special memory about kasujiru, which you can read a bit about here: Sunday and Sake no kasu.

Wednesday

I was in charge of breakfast on this day. When I make breakfast at Somemaru’s house, I try to make something just as it would be served at my parent’s house. On Wednesday I departed from my regular omelets, opting instead for eggs sunny-side-up, hash browns, bacon, toast, and orange slices. In the afternoon, Somemaru and I made ponkan (Chinese honey orange) marmalade and had a wonderful talk about his life and rakugo.

In the evening we met a group of friends at the Suzunariza Theater for an exciting Taishû Engeki production featuring the troupe led by the young and handsome Satomi Takashi.

Thursday

Today was another practice day. In addition to the regular practice-day routine, I had a shamisen lesson of my own. To say the least, this is always a humbling experience. I did my best and just have to make sure I do better next time, improving on all the areas Somemaru told me to work on. During other students’ lessons, I also spent some time practicing taiko (drums) with Aisome. I’ve recently felt a new urgency to practice more since I will be leading a yose workshop in Portland, Oregon this summer. Fortunately, I still have some time left in Japan, and I’m around the right people.

Bunshi ichimon kai

I asked Somemaru if I could be excused before dinner tonight because there was a special rakugo show being put on at the Hanjôtei in the evening. It was a Bunshi ichimon kai, but not one of the typical variety. Tonight was a special charity show to raise money for the Kumano River World Heritage Site marker that was severely damaged in Typhoon Talas last September.

Katsura Bunshi V played a role in this site being built. On his sickbed prior to dying in 2005, he brushed the characters 熊野川 (Kumano River), which were replicated and enlarged for the site marker. Prior to this Bunshi also composed the instant classic Kumano môde (Pilgrimage to Kumano), this being the the last story I heard him perform.

For some reason, I felt “called” to the show tonight. I felt called to support the charity event, and to hear Bunshi’s story narrated by his #4 pupil, Katsura Bunta, the only hanashika who performs Kumano môde today. Bunta did an incredible job. In a touching moment, when he took his final bow, somebody in the audience shouted “Roku daime!!,” indicating they would rather see Katsura Bunta become Bunshi VI than Katsura Sanshi, who is set to ascend to the historic name this July.

It was a wonderful, action packed week. I am now gearing down for a quiet weekend with my books.

今週は、おもしろい出来事が沢山ありました。ほぼ毎日師匠のお宅に伺わせていただきましたが、ここにいくつかのハイライトを書きたいと思います。

火曜日

この日はお稽古の日で、普段通りに朝食を作り、家事をして、生徒さんにお茶を。もちろん、師匠がお呼にみなれば聞こえる所に。レッスン終盤の途中に師匠が夕食のメニューを決めて、愛想さんか僕は材料の買い出しへ行きます。今日、師匠は粕汁気分でした。実は、このメニューが大好きで、去年の冬から食べていないので、本当に嬉しかったです。昨年の粕汁の思い出はこちらへ、日曜と酒の粕

水曜日

この日は僕が朝食を担当させていただました。師匠のお宅で朝食を作る際、必ず自分の親の家で出るようなアメリカンなメニューを用意することにしています。水曜日はいつものオムレツから離れ、その代わりに半熟(目玉) 焼き、ハッシュブラウン、ベイコン、トーストとカットオレンジにしました。昼からはポンカンのマーマレードを作りながら、落語と師匠の人生についての素敵なトークを。

夕方になると他の方と集合して、鈴成座で里美たかしの劇団(大衆演劇)をたっぷりとエンジョイさせていただきました。

木曜日

この日もお稽古日でした。普段通りでしたが、僕もお稽古をさせていただきました。言葉でうまく表現することができませんが、いつにしても師匠とのお稽古では、自分が本当に小さい存在に感じます。当たり前ですが、まだまだ勉強することが山ほどあり、これからますます精進しなくてはいけないと感じます。自分なりに頑張りましたが、次のお稽古までに師匠が教えてくださったことをちゃんと身につけないといけません。他の生徒さんのお稽古中に、奥の部屋で愛染さんと太鼓のお稽古もさせていただきました。今年の夏にポートランド(オレゴン州)で寄席のワークショップを担当することになっているので、そのときまでにできるだけお稽古した方がいいですね。日本、そして師匠のお近くにいれることは、本当にありがたいです。

文枝一門会

木曜日の夜に繁昌亭で特別な会が行われたため、夕飯の前に失礼させていただきました。文枝一門会でしたが、普段の一門会とは異なりました。昨年の九月の台風12号により文枝師匠直筆の熊野川碑が大きな被害を受け、今晩の会は復興祈願のチャリティーのための会でした。

文枝師匠の直筆ですが、2005年に他界なさる前、入院中に「熊野川」の字を書き、これを大きくして複製したものが碑に載せられました。文字をお書きになる前には、古典落語となった「熊野詣」を創作なさいました。実は、これは文枝師匠の一番最後に聴かせていただいた噺です。

なぜか、この会に呼ばれている感じがしました。チャリティーのサポートをするために、そして文枝師匠の4番目のお弟子さんである桂文太師匠の「熊野詣」を聴かせていただくためにも呼ばれている感じがしました。文太師匠しかこの噺はできませんが、さすが文太師匠の高座は本当にすばらしかったです。噺が終わり最後のお辞儀のときに、とても心の動されることがありました。客席から誰かが「六代目!」と大きいかけ声をあげました。よく分かりませんが、今年の7月に歴史的な名跡に継ぐ三枝師匠より文太師匠が継いだ方がいいという意味だったのでしょうか。

いや、今週はいいことが沢山あり過ぎてとても贅沢な1週間でした。今週末は少しペースを落として、静かに本とともに過ごします。

Crying and Laughing with Somemaru 師匠と泣いたり笑ったり

日本語の翻訳(下)を大変お待たせいたしました。

Today Somemaru invited me to see a special taishû engeki production featuring the troupe of Hasegawa Takeya. Today Takeya’s wife, Ai Kyôka, starred in a play as “Okichi,” a woman who, legend has it, was forced to become a mistress against her will for the first American Consul in Japan, Townsend Harris (1804-78). In today’s version, Okichi reluctantly submits to the “call of duty,” but she and her true love, Tsurumatsu (Takeya), reunite years later. As happy as this reunion is, they pay for it dearly in a life filled with tragedy after heartbreaking tragedy. The couple never loses in the eyes of the audience though, because the couple’s love is undying in the truest sense. They maintain utmost dignity by refusing to let go of the one thing they value more than life: one another. Needless to say, I was deeply moved by the performance.

This  play was a tear-jerker indeed. At points the entire theater was in tears! There were also happy points in the play where the audience (a completely packed house, some standing) could not help laughing out loud.

Can something like taishû engeki discussed side by side with rakugo? On the surface, they do not seem to have a single thing in common. In taishû engeki, audiences just have to sit back and enjoy the wonderful spectacle of bright lights, blaring music, fabulous makeup and kimono, and sex appeal. In traditional (denshô) rakugo, much more imagination is needed, along with a little knowledge about early modern Japan. Yet, there are some things these arts have in common that warrants discussing them together.

While taishû engeki is decidedly dramatic and rakugo comedic, they can also be the opposite. Themes of plays and stories are often similar, as are the periods (usually Edo and Meiji) represented. Another important thing they have in common is that they are both forms of taishû geinô, or arts for the masses. Both have their roots in the lower ranks of society, and were meant for people of the same class. While entertainers in both worlds occasional become wealthy, and it is not uncommon for the rich patronize them, taishû engeki and rakugo can still be considered arts of the taishû variety.

After having a good cry, along with some good laughs at the show, Somemaru and I got Chinese for dinner and parted for the evening.

Thank you for a great Monday Shishô!

今日は染丸師匠が大衆演劇の特別公演に誘ってくださり、長谷川武弥座長の一座のショーをたっぷり楽しませていただきました。武弥座長の奥さんである愛京花さんが今日、芝居で「お吉」という役を務めました。お吉という人物については色々な説がありますが、よく言われているのは、お吉が日本で最初の領事となったタウンセンド・ハリス氏(1804−78年)の愛人になり、その後捨てられると。今日の芝居ではお吉が「日本の国のため」義理に屈しますが、数年後、純粋に愛していた最初に諦めた恋人「鶴松」に再会し、彼とよりを戻します。これは涙の再会場面となりますが、その後二人の人生は悲劇だらけで、精一杯です。しかし、そのような悲劇の中でも、お吉と鶴松はとても素敵なカップルです。二人は死に直面することがあっても、彼らの愛は全く死にません。ですから、観客の目から見ると、一見この二人は人生で負けていても、全体像では負けていません。世の中に一番大事なもの(お互い)を離さないから、最後まで威厳を保ちます。今更言う必要はありませんが、とっても感動しました。

何と言っても今日の芝居は涙なしでは見られませんでした。ある場面では、満席立ち見状態の観客全員が、一緒に泣いている様でした。しかし、爆笑する滑稽な場面もありました。

大衆演劇というものは、落語と並べて語ることができるものなのでしょうか。なぜなら、表面的に見ると共通点は一つもないようです。大衆演劇では客は席にポンと座って、明るい照明や、けたたましい音楽や、素敵な化粧や着物や、役者の性的魅力などを楽しむだけでいい、いわば受け身の演劇です。しかし、(伝承)落語の場合は、客の能動性が必要です。落語を聞く上で、客の想像は何よりも大事じゃないでしょうか。さらに、近世日本についての知識が少しあれば、昔から伝わってきた噺の内容をより深く理解することができます。でも、上記に関わらず、大衆演劇と落語は共通点もあるんです。

大衆演劇は明らかにドラマチック、落語は確かに滑稽な芸ですが、実は、両方それぞれがその逆になることもよくあります。芝居と噺のテーマも似ているときもあり、よく描写される時代(江戸・明治)も同じです。そして、両方が日本社会に生きる一般の人々のための大衆芸能であります。大衆演劇も落語も庶民に根ざした芸能であり、元々同じような階級の人々のための芸でありました。近代になって、双方の芸人がお金持ちになる場合もあり、お金持ちの客がスポンサーになることもありますが、両方を大衆芸能と読んでもいいでしょう。

今日の特別公演ではよく泣いたり笑ったりし、その後師匠と一緒に中華料理を食べに行って、御馳走になりました。

師匠、素敵な月曜日、本当にどうもありがとうございました。

Taishû engeki 大衆演劇

 

Today was a free day, so Aisome (#13 pupil [of 13]) and I accompanied Somemaru to the Meisei-za Theater in Momodani for a taishû engeki show featuring the troupe of Miyako Wakamaru. The play and the dance numbers were all great. For those who don’t know what taishû engeki is, it literally means theater for the masses, and some call it working-class kabuki. From my point of view as an American, it reminds me of good drag shows (though taishû engeki actors, predominantly male, play both roles superbly) and revue. Interaction between the actors and audience is key to the show’s success. I’ve seen especially popular actors receive over ¥1,000,000 during a 5-minute dance number, while those who are not so talented are close to ignored. Audiences seem to be made up, for the most, of women in their 40s, 50s, and 60s. Watching these women is yet another fun aspect of taishû engeki. While pictures are technically not allowed, since all of the obachan (older women) were taking picture after picture, I followed suit today.

今日は一日中空いていたので、師匠と愛染さん(13番弟子)と3人で桃谷にある明生座で大衆演劇を見に行きました。座長は都若丸でした。芝居もショーもとても素敵でした。大衆演劇をご存知ない方に、労働者階級の歌舞伎とも呼ばれ、皆のための演劇です。アメリカ人である僕から見て、ハイレベルな女装(しかし、大衆演劇の役者は男女役両方上手く演じます)、またはレビューにも似ています。役者と客のふれ合いはとても大事です。大人気役者が5分の踊りで百万円以上をもらっている姿までも見た事があります。あまり上手くない役者はほとんど無視されます。大衆演劇の客はほとんど40代、50代、60代のおばさんです。彼女たちを見るのはまた大衆演劇の楽しいところの一つです。写真は禁止されていますが、おばさんたちは写真ばっかり撮っていたので、僕も数枚撮ってしまいました。