(Rakugo) Kabuki Stories with Scenery, Part II 道具入り芝居噺 その二 

Miya Nobuaki with Hayashiya ShōjakuI was invited yesterday to another special performance and talk featuring Hayashi Shôjaku at the National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo  (Tokyo bunkazai kennyûjo). The show was once again organized by Tsubouchi Theater Museum research associate, Miya Nobuaki.

Shôjaku performed one subanashi (lit. plain story) and one dôgu iri shibaibanashi (kabuki stories with scenery), which I wrote a bit about in a previous post. The subanashi was a section of Meijin Chōji (Chōji the Master) and the dôgu iri shibaibanashi was Kajikazawa (At the Kajikazawa River). The scenery used for Kajikazawa was beautiful. There was even live (paper) falling snow, which was especially nice on a humid summer day.

Hayashiya Shôjaku during a post-show  interviewI asked Shôjaku how he transports the scenery and so many props and he said that he relies on a professional courier service. Still, putting everything together and packing it up must be a huge undertaking (especially for his deshi). Apparently, his master (Hayashiya Shôzô VIII [1895-1982]) used to load everything onto a handcart and pulled it to shows himself.

Yesterday’s show was another great one. I am looking forward to Shōjaku performing two more times this year at the Tokyo bunkazai kennyûjo, in fall and winter.

昨日、再び東京文化財研究所で行われた林家正雀師匠の公演と芸談インタビューに招待していただき、大変勉強になりました。主催者は、今回も坪内演劇博物館の研究助手の宮信明先生でした。

Miya Nobuaki with Hayashiya Shôjaku正雀師匠が二席をお演りになりました。一席目は素噺である「名人長二」(仏壇叩きから湯河原)で、二席目は道具入り芝居噺の「鰍沢」でした。(前に芝居噺について少し書いたことがあります。)「鰍沢」の道具ですが、とッても美しかったです。雪(紙)までも降っていました。蒸し暑い夏の日にちょうどよかったです。

The scenery used for the story Kajikazawa非常に多い道具は、どのように運びますかと正雀師匠に聞いてみました。毎回宅急便会社にお願いしているとおっしゃっていました。それにしても、準備も片づけも大仕事に違いません(弟子さんもおつかれさまです)。正雀師匠の師匠(八代目林家正蔵 1895-1982)が道具を手車に乗せて、寄席まで自分で引っ張っていたそうです。汗

昨日もたっぷりと楽しませていただきました。今年の秋と冬にもう一度ずつ正雀師匠の公演と芸談インタビューが東京文化財研究所で行われます。ぜひ、そのときも聴きにいけたらと思っています。

Advertisements

Freedom from Dissertating 論文からの解放

Since moving to Tokyo last September, I have spent most of my time in the Waseda University library, writing my dissertation. I finished last week and sent copies to my committee. I had a great time researching and writing about Kamigata rakugo, but am happy to be wrapping things up.

I still have some things to do to prepare for defense next month, but I took the last few days off to recharge. I’ve been meaning to go to the Edo-Tokyo Museum for some time, so yesterday, I decided to ride my bike over and spend the day there. 

Gojō Tenjin Shrine annual matsuri, UenoI live pretty close to Ueno Park. As I rode around Shinobazu Pond, I heard some Japanese drums, bells, and flutes playing in the distance–my kind of music! As I neared the south end of Ueno Park, I found the Gojō Tenjin Shrine matsuri (festival) in full swing. The timing could not have been better. 

After watching for a few minutes, I peddled west on Kasuga-dōri, crossed the Sumida River, then headed south to the museum. I parked my bike and walked past the Ryōgoku Kokugikan (also known as the Sumō Hall). I was just in time to see a procession of rikishi (sumō wrestlers) making their way into the Hall. I later learned that the yokozuna Hakuhō won his 29th title at the Emperor’s Cup that day. 

Edo-Tokyo MuseumThe Edo-Tokyo Museum complex is huge and the exhibits are fabulous. Two of the attractions are life-size replicas of the Nakamura-za, a kabuki theater, and a section of early modern Japan’s most famous bridge, Nihonbashi. My favorite part of the museum are the exhibits featuring early modern Edo chōnin (townsman, i.e., commoner) life. This is because they give me better ideas of the kinds of places where rakugo stories take place.

Hayashi Shōzō otoshibanashi-goyaSpeaking of rakugo, the art did not have this name prior to the Meiji period (1868-1912). Popular comic storytelling was referred to by a number of names over the past three hundred years or so. One of the more recent ones was otoshibanashi. In a wonderfully detailed model of the Ryōgoku area, one of Edo’s greatest entertainment districts, there is a otoshibanashi hall featuring the storyteller Hayashiya Shōzō I (1781-1842). Assuming that the model is accurate, yose in the past were much smaller than the yose we know today, which seat around 200 to 300 people. Hayashiya Shōzō’s yose looks like it could hold about fifty people, or one hundred at the very maximum. Of course there were many more yose in those days. In the immediate vicinity are a number of other theaters small and large, and a row of hairdressers. 

Katsura Utasuke, Edo-Tokyo MuseumThis was really my lucky day. As if the day was not good enough already, today turned out to be one of the few days each month when rakugo is presented at the museum! Today’s rakugoka was Katsura Utamaru’s second deshi, Katsura Utasuke. He performed a shinsaku piece called Ramen-ya (The Ramen Shop). Yanagi Nangyoku was also on hand to present kyokugoma (top spinning tricks). 

I had a great time at the museum, but hardly had enough time to look at all of the exhibits as long as I would have liked. I will just have to go back again. The Edo-Tokyo Museum is very reasonable at just ¥600 for general admission (¥480 for students).

Kaiten-zushiAll of that traditional Japanese culture made me want to have Japanese food for dinner. I rode my bike back to Ueno and enjoyed a few plates of sushi. The perfect way to wrap up a my “field trip.”

I think I am now fully recharged, ready to set my mind on defending my dissertation in Hawaii next month. It is hard to believe that my life as a graduate student will soon come to an end. I am not yet sure where I will work yet, but I do know that Japanese culture and food will continue being important parts of my life.  

去年の9月に東京に移ってから、ほぼ毎日早稲田大学の図書館で博士論文に集中してきました。先週やっと書き上げ、大学院の教授たちに送りました。上方落語について研究し、論文を書くことは楽しかったんですが、同時に卒業に近づいているということもとても嬉しいです。

来月は論文に対する質疑応答の面接が大学であり、さまざまな準備がまだ残っていますが、数日前からちょっと羽を伸ばして充電をしてきました。以前から江戸東京博物館に行きたかったので、昨日は自転車に乗って、そこで一日を過ごすことにしました。

Ryōgoku Kokugikan僕は上野公園の近くに住んでいます。不忍池を回っているところで、大好きな和太鼓、鉦、笛の音が耳に入り、上野公園の南側に着くと、なんと、五條天神社例大祭の最中ではないですか!なんといういいタイミングでしょう。

しばらく祭りを見てから、春日通りから西の方へ向かいました。隅田川を渡り、南に曲がって博物館の方へ。自転車を駐輪場に置いて、両国国技館の横を歩いていたら、今度は力士の行列ではないですか!後で分かりましたが、この日は横綱・白鵬が29回目の優勝を果たした日でした。

博物館はとても大きく、展示もとても興味深かったです。実物大の複製の中村座(歌舞伎の劇場)と江戸時代の最も有名な橋であった日本橋(一部)がとてもよかったです。僕にとって、一番良かった展示は江戸の町人のエリアでした。なぜならば、落語で描写されてきた世界がより具体的にイメージできるからです。

Otoshibanashi-goya落語ということばですが、明治時代以前は「落語」と呼ばれていませんでした。300年ぐらい前から大衆滑稽話芸・舌耕芸はそれぞれの名前がありまして、わりと最近のは「オトシバナシ」でした。博物館には、江戸の盛り場であった両国辺りの詳細な模型に、落しばなしの小屋があります。のぼりに林家正蔵(初代、1781-1842)の名前が見えます。模型が正しければ、昔の寄席は今の寄席より小さかったです。現在の寄席は200人~300人も入れますが、模型の中の林家正蔵の小屋は50人(無理して100人?)ぐらいしか入らなさそうです。まあ、確かにその当時の寄席は今より多かったですが… 落しばなしの小屋の周辺には他の劇場、大きいのも小さいのも、色々あります。髪結いさんもたくさん並んでいます。

Rakugo from old Nihonbashi今日はいいことがたくさんありましたが、これで終わらなかったです。博物館では、中村座の前でイベントをやるんですが、今日は偶然落語が一席ありました。今日の落語家は桂歌丸師匠の2番弟子である桂歌助さんで、「ラーメン屋」という新作落語をしました。これにやなぎ南玉さんの曲駒までもあって、本当にラッキーでした。

今日は博物館でゆっくり楽しめましたが、もっとゆっくりしたかったですね。また行くしかないですね。観覧料は600円(学生480円)しかかからないので、とてもリーズナブルですね。

さまざまな日本の伝統文化を身につけたあと、やはり和食が食べたくなりました。自転車で上野に帰り、お寿司を食べにいきました。今日の「研究日」にぴったりな終わり方。

これで、たっぷり充電できたので、来月はハワイでの論文の面接で頑張れると思います。もうちょっとで大学院の生活が終わるなんて、まだ信じられません。仕事などはまだ決まっていないですが、将来日本の文化と和食が自分につながることは間違いないです。

For Early Birds, Variety 早起きには演芸

San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHKThis morning I woke up at 3:41 a.m. I guess my body is still on U.S. time.

There used to be much more traditional variety entertainment on Japanese TV, but these days rakugo is generally aired in the early morning hours, if at all.

This morning I watched “Variety Picture Book” (Engei zukan, NHK, Sundays 5:15-5:45 a.m.), hosted by Tokyo-native shamisen mandan (comic chat with shamisen) artist San’yûtei Koenka (1960-).

Sakai Kunio-Tôru on San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHKToday’s featured performers were the Kansai-based manzai duo Saikai Kunio-Tôru, brothers originally from Iwate prefecture who began performing in 1972, and Tokyo rakugo master San’yûtei Kinba IV, who boasts the longest running professional career in all of rakugo at 72 years–he began his apprenticeship under Kinba III in 1941 at age 12.

I was happy to see Sakai Kunio-Tôru on TV because I have met Kunio, the “strait man” (tsukkomi) in the duo (right side of photo). Thanks to Somemaru, I have been out to dinner and karaoke with him. Kunio was a fabulous singer and, in fact, his crooning was a big part of the act aired this morning. Very funny indeed.

San'yûtei Kinba IV on San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHKKinba told the story “Long and Short [Tempered]” (Chôtan), which features two friends–an extremely patient man from Kamigata and a short-fused man from Edo/Tokyo. The latter repeatedly gets angry at the former because he talks and smokes way too slowly. At the end of the story, the Kamigata man has something to say, but fears that his Edokko friend will get angry if he tells tells him. No, the Edokko says, urging him to speak up. When the Kamigata man slowly informs his friend that his sleeve in on fire, the Edokko becomes furious. The former then delivers the ochi: I guess I shouldn’t have told you after all. Rakugo by such a seasoned master is truly a luxury to listen to. San'yûtei Kinba IV on San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHKInterestingly, Kinba used a kendai and hizakakushi–generally only used in the Kamigata tradition–for this story. This was not simply for decoration, though. He used it to conceal the lower half of his body as he sat cross-legged. It must have become too painful for Kinba to sit in the traditional manner, seiza.

I woke up too early this morning, but was rewarded with variety on TV. I think I should continue getting up early enough to watch programs like these, but not before 5:00 a.m. if I can help it.

今朝は3:41に起きてしまいました。体はまだアメリカの時間で動いているみたいです。

昔は演芸の番組がよくテレビで放送されましたが、現在は放送されるとしたらほとんど早朝になります。

今朝、三味線漫談家の三遊亭小円歌が司会を勤める「三遊亭小円歌の演芸図鑑」という番組(NHK, 毎週日曜 午前5:15~5:45)を見ました。

Sakai Kunio-Tôru on San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHK今日の出演者は昭和47年結成で岩手県出身の兄弟漫才のコンビ、関西を中心に活動されている酒井くにお・とおる師匠、そして昭和16年、12歳で三代目三遊亭金馬に入門なさった東京落語の大師匠の四代 三遊亭金馬でした。 金馬師匠は2014年現在、東西併せて落語界最古参の落語家でいらっしゃいます。

ツッコミを勤める酒井くにお師匠(写真の右側)をテレビで見れて嬉しかったです。何故ならば、お会いしたことがあるからです。染丸師匠のおかげで、ディナーもカラオケもご一緒できました。くにお師匠は歌がとてもお上手で、実は今日のネタでは師匠の思い入れのある流行歌が中心となっていました。たくさん笑わせていただきました。

San'yûtei Kinba IV on San'yûtei Koenka no Engei zukan, property of NHK金馬師匠のお噺は気の長い上方ものと超短気の江戸っ子が登場する「長短」をお演りになりました。上方出身の男は喋るにも煙草を吸うにもあまりにも時間がかかるので、江戸っ子が何度も怒ります。噺の最後に上方ものは言いたい事がありますが、怒られると思って遠慮します。怒らないと江戸っ子が約束しますが、着物の袖が燃えているよとゆっくりと知らされろと、やはり、江戸っ子が怒り出します。オチで上方ものが言います、「やっぱり、おせえねえ (教えない) ほうがよかった」。大名人の落語を聴けて、まことに贅沢でした。おもしろいことに、金馬師匠が普段上方でしか使わない見台と膝隠しを置いていました。これはただの置き道具・飾りではなく、下半身を隠すためでした。お足が痛んでいらっしゃるためか、正座ではなく胡座をかいてお演りになりした。

今朝の目覚めは早すぎましたが、おかげで演芸の番組が見れました。これからも早起きしてこのような番組を見たいと思いますが、5:00前に起きるのを早く止めたいと思います。

(Rakugo) Kabuki Stories with Scenery, Part I 道具入り芝居噺 その一

One basic way Kamigata rakugo is different from Tokyo rakugo is that stories in the former regularly include various music and instrumental sound effects (e.g., patting drum with soft mallet for the sound of falling snow). This is especially true for travel stories (tabibanashi) and kabuki-inspired stories (shibaibanashi). Tokyo rakugo is, on the whole, performed without music — stories that have music are often adaptations of Kamigata pieces.

Dôgu iri shibaibanashi backdropThere is an exception to this rule, however. There is an old Tokyo tradition called “kabuki stories with scenery” (dôgu iri shibaibanashi), which is full of hayashi music and authentic kabuki scenes. This is a form of rakugo, but the aim is not necessarily make audiences laugh; the goal is to impress. In this art hanashika implement curtains and colorfully painted backdrops to create a more authentic kabuki atmosphere. These painted backdrops remind one of the (much smaller) illustrated boards used in Japanese “paper drama” (kamishibai). Dôgu iri shibaibanashi even have quick onstage costume changes (hayagawari) and “men in black” (kuroko) to assist, usually the hanashika‘s own pupils. Hanashika do not sit on cushions (zabuton) for these stories because they move around a great deal, frequently rising to their knees.

Storytellers have been adapting kabuki material and doing impressions of kabuki actors since the middle of the seventeenth century. San’yûtei Enshô I (1768-1838) was likely the first hanashika to perform shibaibanashi in yose, in 1797.  Dôgu iri shibaibanashi date at least to the turn of the nineteenth century when they were introduced by Kingentei Bashô I (d. 1838). Because the shogunate viewed kabuki as a threat, shibaibanashi were often regulated.¹

Hayashiya Shôjaku performing dôgu iri shibaibanashi

There are very few people who perform dōgu iri shibaibanashi today. Hayashi Shôjaku, a pupil of Hayashiya Shôzô VIII (1895-1982), may be the only recognized master of the art

I was fortunate to be invited yesterday to a special performance and talk featuring Shôjaku at the National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo  (Tokyo bunkazai kennyûjo). The show was organized by an acquaintance and Tsubouchi Theater Museum research associate, Miya Nobuaki.

I had previously read about dōgu iri shibaibanashi, but, needless to say, I got a great deal more from seeing Shōjaku perform live. Different from regular shibaibanashi (i.e., without scenery, etc.) I have heard in Tokyo and especially Osaka, the tone of Shôjaku’s story was decidedly serious and there was no punch line (ochi), which is common for this genre. Dôgu iri shibaibanashi felt like true one-man kabuki as opposed to a kabuki parody, which is generally the case with regular shibaibanashi.

I still know very little about dôgu iri shibaibanashi, so I look forward to seeing Shôjaku perform this rare art again in the near future.

(Rakugo) Kabuki Stories with Scenery, Part II 

上方落語と東京落語の基本的な違いを申しますと、上方落語は噺にさまざまなハメモノ(囃子音楽、音響効果)を日常的に含むということがあげられます。旅噺と芝居噺は特にそうです。東京落語は一般的に音楽を使用しない芸で、ハメモノが実際に入るネタ(音曲噺)のほとんどはもともと上方からのものです。

Hayashiya Shôjaku performing dôgu iri shibaibanashi

しかし、例外があります。東京には囃子音楽や本格的な歌舞伎の演技がたっぷり入る道具入り芝居噺という古い伝統があります。落語の一種ですが、道具入り芝居噺の目的は客を笑わすことではありません。目的は客を感動させることです。芝居道具ですが、幕もあり、紙芝居の引き抜き絵を連想させる色鮮やかな背景板もあり、本格的な歌舞伎の空気をだすためのものです。道具入り芝居には、早変りや黒子までもいます。噺家があちらこちら動いて、膝立ちになったりしますので、座布団を使いません。

噺家(舌耕者)は17世紀の半ばごろから歌舞伎の内容(声色など)を取り入れているそうです。初代三遊亭円生 (1768-1838) が寛政9(1797) 年に寄席で芝居噺を披露したのが最初と見られます。道具入り芝居噺の場合、初代金原亭馬生 (没年1838)が最初に道具を芝居噺に取り入れたので、19世紀の始めからあったものと考えられます。幕府が歌舞伎を脅威と見なしたためか、芝居噺もよく政令を発せられました。¹

今日現在、道具入り芝居噺を演る噺家は非常に少ないです。故八代目林家正蔵師匠 (彦六, 1895-1982) の弟子である林家正雀師匠はその第一人者です。

Miya Nobuaki with Hayashiya Shôjaku

昨日はとてもありがたいことに、東京文化財研究所で行われた林家正雀師匠の公演と芸談インタビューに招待していただき、とても勉強になりました。主催者は僕の知り合いでもあり、坪内演劇博物館の研究助手である宮信明先生でした。

以前、道具入り芝居噺についての本を読んだことはありましたが、正雀師匠の公演を実際に拝聴し、多くのことを学びました。東京、特に大阪で聴いた一般的な芝居噺(道具なし)に比べると、正雀師匠の芝居噺はシリアスでした。最後にオチはなく、道具入り芝居噺はこれが一般的だそうです。本格的な一人歌舞伎に感じ、一般的な芝居噺の歌舞伎のパロディーとは明らかに違いました。

道具入り芝居噺についてまだ分からないことが多いので、正雀師匠の貴重な高座をまた近いうちに聴かせていただきたいと(役者風に)存じまス〜ル〜!(バタバタッ!)

道具入り芝居噺 その二

¹(参考) See shibaibanashi in Heinz Morioka and Miyoko Sasaki, Rakugo: The Popular Narrative Art of Japan (Cambridge: Harvard Council on East Asian Studies, 1990).

New (English) Book on Rakugo 新しい落語本(英語)

Ian McArthur book coverUntil this year, just two scholarly books on rakugo had been published in English. The first one was Heinz Morioka and Miyoko Sasaki’s Rakugo: The Popular Narrative Art of Japan (Cambridge: Harvard Council on East Asian Studies, 1990; 470 pp.). The second was Lori Brau’s Rakugo: Performing Comedy and Cultural Heritage in Contemporary Tokyo (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2008; 274 pp.).

This year, Ian McArthur published the third, Henry Black – On Stage in Meiji Japan (Victoria, Australia: Monash University Publishing, 2013; 286pp.), which has much to do with rakugo. The book’s focus is on Australian-born British citizen, Henry Black (stage name Kairakutei Burakku I, 1858-1923), who made a career as a professional storyteller (rakugoka) and actor in Japan in the 1880s and 1890s. Among other things, the book examines the role Black played in bringing nineteenth-century European notions of modernity to Japan during the Meiji era.

I am happy to introduce this book on my blog, and am looking forward to getting a copy of my own.

英語で書かれている落語についての学究的な本は、現在まで二冊しか出版されていません。その一つは、森岡ハインツ先生と佐々木 みよ子先生の「Rakugo: The Popular Narrative Art of Japan」(落語 日本の大衆話芸, Cambridge: Harvard Council on East Asian Studies, 1990; 470頁). 二つ目は、ロリー・ブラウ先生の「Rakugo: Performing Comedy and Cultural Heritage in Contemporary Tokyo」(落語 現代における東京のコメディーおよび文化遺産の実演, Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2008; 274頁)です。

しかし今年、新たに落語に関係の深い本が出版されました。イアン・マッカーサー先生の「Henry Black – On Stage in Meiji Japan 」(明治時代の舞台を踏む  ヘンリー・ブラック  Victoria, Australia: Monash University Publishing, 2013; 286頁) という本です。この本はオーストラリア生まれ英国国籍、そして明治半ばに日本で落語家や役者として活躍したヘンリー・ブラック(芸名は初代 快楽亭 ブラック、1858-1923) という人物を中心に、19世紀ヨーロッパでの現代化における価値観、そしてその価値観をブラック氏がどのように明治時代の日本に紹介したかといういうテーマで構成されています。

落語研究においてもこの本はとても貴重な内容だと思いますし、早くこの本を手に入れたいと思っています。